Interpreting in the 21st Century

Challenges and opportunities

Editors
| University of Bologna
| University of Trieste
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027216496 (Eur) | EUR 117.00
ISBN 9781588112811 (USA) | USD 176.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027297037 | EUR 117.00 | USD 176.00
 
This book contains a selection of papers presented at the First Forlì Conference on Interpreting Studies, held on 9-11 November 2000, which saw the participation of leading researchers in the field. The volume offers a comprehensive overview of the current situation and future prospects in interpretation studies, and in the interpreting profession at the beginning of a new century. Topics addressed include not only theoretical and methodological issues, but also applications to training and quality. The range of subjects covered is thus broad and comprehensive. Particular attention is given to the changing profile of the profession, as different modes of interpreting "outside the booth" — i.e. all forms of "dialogue interpreting", as well as interpreting for the media — give rise to new and stimulating research work.

The variety of papers in this volume bears witness to the wealth of different perspectives in interpreting studies today. It covers topics of interest to scholars of translation and interpretation studies, professional interpreters, and to anyone interested in language mediation in its theoretical and applied aspects.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 43]  2002.  x, 335 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
David C. Snelling
ix–x
Introduction
Giuliana Garzone and Maurizio Viezzi
1–11
Focus on research
13
Interpreting research: Descriptive aspects and methodological proposals
Alessandra Riccardi
15–27
A methodology for the analysis of interpretation corpora
Robin Setton
29–45
Resurrecting the corp(us¦se): Towards an encoding standard for interpreting data
Marco Cencini and Guy Aston
47–62
Retrospection as a method of studying the process of simultaneous interpreting
Gun-Viol Vik-Tuovinen
63–71
Exploring hesitation in consecutive interpreting: An empirical study
Peter Mead
73–82
Anthroponyms, acronyms and allocutives in interpreting from Russian
Laura Salmon Kovarski
83–94
Researching interpreting quality: Models and methods
Franz Pöchhacker
95–106
Quality and norms in interpretation
Giuliana Garzone
107–119
Quality in interpreting and its prerequisites: A framework for a comprehensive view
Sylvia Kalina
121–130
Interpreting outside the conference hall
131
Community interpreter training: Past, present, future
Helge Niska
133–144
Language as a human right: The challenges for legal interpreting
Erik Hertog
145–157
Medical interpreting: Some salient features
Bernd Meyer
159–169
Spoken-language and signed-language interpretation: Are they really so different?
Cynthia Jane Kellett Bidoli
171–179
Interpreters for peace
Claudia Monacelli
181–193
Physiological stress responses during media and conference interpreting
Ingrid Kurz
195–202
New perspectives and challenges for interpretation: The example of television
Gabriele Mack
203–213
Linguistic mediation on Italian television: When the interpreter is not an interpreter: a case study
Delia Chiaro
215–225
Interpreter training
227
The quest for optimal relevance: The need to equip students with a pragmatic compass
Sergio Viaggio
229–244
Aptitude and Conference Interpretation: A proposal for a testing methodology based on paraphrase
Salvador Pippa and Mariachiara Russo
245–256
The role of linguistics in the interpreter’s curriculum
Francesca Santulli
257–266
Autonomy of the interpreted text
Christopher Garwood
267–276
Computer-assisted interpreter training
Laura Gran, Angela Carabelli and Raffaela Merlini
277–294
Interpreting in the 21st century: What lies ahead: Summary of the closing panel discussion
Amalia Amato and Peter Mead
295–301
References
303–322
Name index
323–328
Subject index
329–335
“[...] this book is a most timely contribution to the growing presence of Interpreting Studies. It will be a valuable stepping stone on the way to the establishment of Interpreting Studies as a discipline in its own right and it will provide the future development of Interpreting Studies with rigorous direction.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

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2016.  In Conference Interpreting – A Trainer’s Guide [Benjamins Translation Library, 121], Crossref logo
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2020.  In The Quest for Argumentative Equivalence [Argumentation in Context, 18], Crossref logo
Antonini, Rachele, Letizia Cirillo, Linda Rossato & Ira Torresi
2017.  In Non-professional Interpreting and Translation [Benjamins Translation Library, 129],  pp. 2 ff. Crossref logo
Carrió-Pastor, María Luisa
2016.  In Technology Implementation in Second Language Teaching and Translation Studies [New Frontiers in Translation Studies, ],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Chen, Jing
2009. Authenticity in Accreditation Tests for Interpreters in China. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 3:2  pp. 257 ff. Crossref logo
Donovan, Clare
2011. Ethics in the Teaching of Conference Interpreting. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 5:1  pp. 109 ff. Crossref logo
Gile, Daniel
2005. Citation Patterns in the T&I Didactics Literature. FORUM 3:2  pp. 85 ff. Crossref logo
Gile, Daniel
2005. La recherche sur les processus traductionnels et la formation en interprétation de conférence. Meta 50:2  pp. 713 ff. Crossref logo
Gumul, Ewa & Andrzej Łyda
2007. The Time Constraint in Conference Interpreting: Simultaneous vs. Consecutive. Research in Language 5  pp. 165 ff. Crossref logo
Pöchhacker, Franz
2010.  In Handbook of Translation Studies [Handbook of Translation Studies, 1],  pp. 158 ff. Crossref logo
Van Besien, Fred & Chris Meuleman
2008. Style Differences among Simultaneous Interpreters. The Translator 14:1  pp. 135 ff. Crossref logo
Wehrmeyer, Jennifer
2014. Introducing Grounded Theory into translation studies. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 32:3  pp. 373 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2002074684