Historical Linguistics 2015

Selected papers from the 22nd International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Naples, 27-31 July 2015

Editors
| University of Naples Federico II
| University of Chieti-Pescara
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027203250 | EUR 115.00 | USD 173.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262455 | EUR 115.00 | USD 173.00
 
The collection of articles presented in this volume addresses a number of general theoretical, methodological and empirical issues in the field of Historical Linguistics, in different levels of analysis and on different themes: (i) phonology, (ii) morphology, (iii) morphosyntax, (iv) syntax, (v) diachronic typology, (vi) semantics and pragmatics, and (vii) language contact, variation and diffusion. The topics discussed, often in a comparative perspective, feature a variety of languages and language families and cover a wide range of research areas. Novel analyses and often new diachronic data — also from less known and under-investigated languages — are provided to the debate on the principles, mechanisms, paths and models of language change, as well as the relationship between synchronic variation and diachrony. The volume is of interest to scholars of different persuasions working on all aspects of language change.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 348]  2019.  viii, 639 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
Michela Cennamo and Claudia Fabrizio
2–8
Part I. Phonology
12–74
Chapter 1. Old Irish consonant quality re-examined
Hans Henrich Hock
12–26
Chapter 2. The use of the past to explain the past: Roman grammarians and the collapse of vowel quantity
Marco Mancini
28–51
Chapter 3. Pertinacity in loanwords: Same underlying systems, different outputs
Aditi Lahiri and Holly J. Kennard
58–74
Part II. Morphology
78–184
Chapter 4. Ablaut in Armenian nasal declension
Giancarlo Schirru
78–95
Chapter 5. Gender and declension mismatches in West Nordic
Ivar Berg
98–114
Chapter 6. The development of gender and countability effects in German ung- and English ing-nominals
Martina Werner and Gianina Iordachioaia
116–132
Chapter 7. Where do Italian -ata nouns come from?: Some new diachronic evidence on a Romance derivational pattern
Claudia Fabrizio
134–148
Chapter 8. Diachrony and morphological equilibrium: The case of the southern New Indo-Aryan verb
Paolo Milizia
150–169
Chapter 9. Anti-relevant, contra-iconic but system-adequate: On unexpected inflectional changes
Livio Gaeta
172–184
Part III. Morphosyntax
188–241
Chapter 10. Impersonal passives and the suffix -r in the Indo-European languages
Francesco Rovai
188–216
Chapter 11. The Old English verbal prefixes for- and ge-: Their effects on the transitivity of morphological causative pairs
Esaúl Ruiz Narbona
218–241
Part IV. Syntax
246–402
Chapter 12. Enclitic -(m)a ‘but’ / -(y)a ‘and’ in Hittite: Losing extraordinary syntactic behavior
Andrei V. Sideltsev
246–269
Chapter 13. State representation and dynamic processes in Homeric Greek: The aorist in - in Homeric Greek
Domenica Romagno
272–286
Chapter 14. Effecting a change: Perfect and middle in some Indo-European languages
Romano Lazzeroni
288–300
Chapter 15. Early Indo-European dialects and innovations of aspect systems
Jadranka Gvozdanovic
302–318
Chapter 16. Perfecting the notion of Sprachbund: Perfects and resultatives in the “Stratified Convergence Zones” of Europe
Bridget Drinka
320–341
Chapter 17. Parameters in the development of Romance perfective auxiliary selection
Adam Ledgeway
344–384
Chapter 18. Adverbs and the left periphery of non-finite clauses in Old Spanish
Teresa Maria Rodríguez Ramalle and Cristina Matute
386–402
Part V. Diachronic typology
406–441
Chapter 19. The sources of antipassive constructions: A cross-linguistic survey
Andrea Sansó
406–421
Chapter 20. A diachronic account of converbal constructions in Old Rajasthani
Krzysztof Stroński, Joanna Tokaj and Saartje Verbeke
424–441
Part VI. Semantics and pragmatics
446–560
Chapter 21. The locative alternation with spray/load verbs in Old English
Katarzyna Sówka-Pietraszewska
446–457
Chapter 22. Penetration of French-origin lexis in Middle English occupational domains
Richard P. Ingham, Louise Sylvester and Imogen Marcus
460–478
Chapter 23. Meaning change from superlatives to definite descriptions: A semantic approach
Jun Chen and Dawei Jin
480–499
Chapter 24. Towards diachronic word classes universals
Matthias Gerner
502–517
Chapter 25. Grammaticalizing the face in a first generation sign language: The case of “Z”
John B. Haviland
520–560
Part VII. Language contact, variation and diffusion
564–630
Chapter 26. Linguistic divergence under contact
Nicholas Evans
564–591
Chapter 27. Roots and branches of variation across dialects of English
Sali A. Tagliamonte
594–613
Chapter 28. Waves in computer simulations of linguistic diffusion
Luzius Thöny
616–630
Index
631
Language index
637
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019007610