Language Description, History and Development

Linguistic indulgence in memory of Terry Crowley

Editors
| University of New England, Australia
| University of the South Pacific
| University of New England, Australia
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027252524 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027292940 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
This volume in memory of Terry Crowley covers a wide range of languages: Australian, Oceanic, Pidgins and Creoles, and varieties of English. Part I, Linguistic Description and Typology, includes chapters on topics such as complex predicates and verb serialization, noun incorporation, possessive classifiers, diphthongs, accent patterns, modals in Australian English and directional terms in atoll-based languages. Part II, Historical Linguistics and Linguistic History, ranges from the reconstruction of Australian languages, to reflexes of Proto-Oceanic, to the lexicon of early Melanesian Pidgin. Part III, Language Development and Linguistic Applications, comprises studies of lexicography, language in education, and language endangerment and language revival, spanning the Pacific from South Australia and New Zealand to Melanesia and on to Colombia. The volume will whet the appetite of anyone interested in the latest linguistic research in this richly multilingual part of the globe.
[Creole Language Library, 30]  2007.  xv, 514 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of contributors
ix–xi
Abbreviations
xiii–xiv
Acknowledgements
xv
Introduction
Jeff Siegel, John Lynch and Diana Eades
1–7
“Try look that yellow book”: The legacy of Terry Crowley’s work in Cape York Peninsula
Helen Harper
9–12
Part I: Language description and linguistic typology
13
1. Describing languages and ethnographic fieldwork
William R. Thurston
15–25
2. A desiderative complement construction in Warrwa.
William B. McGregor
27–40
3. Noun incorporation in Rembarrnga discourse.
Graham R. McKay
41–52
4. A revised view of the verbal suffixes of Yugambeh-Bundjalung
Margaret Sharpe
53–68
5. Close and remote objects in a language with a single transitive suffix
Anna Margetts
69–78
6. Possessive classifier bila- in Raga reflects value in people
Hannah Vari-Bogiri
79–87
7. On the subject of subjects in Māori
R.B. Harlow
89–100
8. Pointing at the lagoon: Directional terms in Oceanic atoll-based languages
Bill Palmer
101–117
9. Does Hawaiian have diphthongs? And how can you tell?
Kenneth L. Rehg
119–131
10. Accent patterns for English loanwords in Samoan: A window on prosody
Albert J. Schütz
133–146
11. Syntactic properties of the definitive accent in Tongan
Therese Mary Aitchison
147–158
12. Tok Pisin ia-bracketing: Neither substrate nor syntax
Joel Bradshaw
159–167
13. On Papiamentu ku
Claire Lefebvre and Isabelle Therrien
169–182
14. “… and the blue bird /flju/ away”: Yod insertion in Fiji English
France Mugler
183–195
15. Modal wars: Some ascendant semi-modals in Australian English
Peter Collins
197–208
16. Complex predication and the coverb construction
Mengistu Amberber, Brett Baker and Mark Harvey
209–219
17. Verb serialisation and incipient grammaticalisation in Abma
Cindy Schneider
221–235
18. The demise of serial verbs in South Efate
Nicholas Thieberger
237–251
Part II: Language history and historical linguistics
253
19. Nganyaywana revisited: Lessons from Terry Crowley’s work on New England languages
Paul Black
255–265
20. Divergent regularity in word-initial truncation in the Arandic languages
Harold Koch
267–280
21. Two kinds of locative construction in Oceanic languages: A robust distinction
Malcolm D. Ross
281–295
22. The prenasalised trills of Manus
Robert Blust
297–311
23. Noun articles in Torres and Banks languages: Conservation and innovation
Alexandre François
313–326
24. The reflexes of Proto-Oceanic *na in Unua
Elizabeth Pearce
327–339
25. Proto who utilised turmeric, and how?
Ritsuko Kikusawa and Lawrence A. Reid
341–354
26. On the lexicon of Early Melanesian Pidgin
Ross Clark
355–368
Part III: Language development and linguistic applications
369
27. Structure, style and content in dictionary entries for an Oceanic language
D.S. Walsh
371–381
28. The Fijian dictionary experience
Paul Geraghty
383–394
29. Lexicography for your friends
Mark Donohue
395–405
30. Language-in-education in New Zealand: Policies and practices
Roger Barnard
407–418
31. Language-in-education policy in the context of language death: Conflicts in policy and practice in Colombia
Anthony J. Liddicoat and Timothy Jowan Curnow
419–430
32. The Crowley corrective: An alternative voice for language endangerment
Michael Walsh
431–437
33. Language sizes in Melanesia
Robert Early
439–456
34. Funeral liturgy as a strategy for language revival
Robert Amery and Dennis O’Brien
457–467
References
469–502
Index
503–512
“Throughout Language Description, History and Development, there are copious references to Crowley's work, and the list of references to his published work, a total of close to a 200 papers in all. Many of the contributors mention personal anecdotes or shared experiences involving Crowley, all attesting to the respect and affection with which he was regarded. A common theme in the personal recollections is the reaction of shock to his untimely passing, and conjecture about what further accomplishments he might otherwise have achieved. The volume is a worthy commemoration of his life and work, and a reminder of his enormous contribution to linguistics.”
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2007003854