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Vol. 25:2 (2015) ► pp. 287313

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“The doctor said I suffer from Vitamin € deficiency”
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References

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2018.  In The Dynamics of Interactional Humor [Topics in Humor Research, 7],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
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