Article published in:
Review of Cognitive Linguistics
Vol. 18:1 (2020) ► pp. 1941
References

References

Alba-Juez, L., & Attardo, S.
(2014) The evaluative palette of verbal irony. In G. Thompson & L. Alba-Juez (Eds.), Evaluation in Context. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Athanasiadou, A., & Colston, H. L.
(Eds.) (2017) Irony in language use and communication. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barcelona, A.
(Ed.) (2000) Metaphor and metonymy at the crossroads. Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Benczes, R., Barcelona, A., & Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J.
(Eds.) (2011) Defining metonymy in Cog- nitive Linguistics. Towards a consensus view. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bierwiaczonek, B.
(2013) Metonymy in language, thought and brain. Sheffield: Equinox.Google Scholar
Butler, C. S., & Gonzálvez–García, F.
(2014) Exploring functional–cognitive space. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dirven, R., & Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J.
(2010) Looking back at 30 years of Cognitive Linguistics. In E. Tabakowska, M. Choiński & Ł. Wiraszka (Eds.), Cognitive Linguistics in Action. From Theory to Application and Back (pp. 13–70). Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Fauconnier, G., & Turner, M.
(2002) The way we think. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Gibbs, R. W.
(2011) Evaluating Conceptual Metaphor Theory. Discourse Processes, 48(8), 529–562. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Goldberg, A.
(1995) Constructions: A construction grammar approach to argument structure. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
(2006) Constructions at work: The nature of generalization in language. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Herrero, J.
(2011) The role of metonymy in complex tropes. In R. Benczes, A. Barcelona, & F. J. Ruiz de Mendoza (Eds.), Defining metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics: Towards a consensus view (pp. 167–194). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kövecses, Z.
(2005) Metaphor in culture. Universality and variation. New York & Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2015) Where metaphors come from. Reconsidering context in metaphor. New York: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
[ p. 40 ]
Lakoff, G.
(1987) Women, fire, and dangerous things: What categories reveal about the mind. Chicago: University of Chicago. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M.
(1980) Metaphors we live by. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
(1999) Philosophy in the flesh. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Littlemore, J.
(2015) Metaphor in specialist discourse. Insights and implications for metaphor studies and beyond. In J. B. Herrmann & T. Berber Sardinha (Eds.), Metaphor in Specialist Discourse: Investigating Metaphor Use in Specific and Popularized Discourse Contexts (pp. 299–314). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Martin, J. R., & White, P. R. R.
(2005) The language of evaluation. Appraisal in English. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Palinkas, I.
(2014) Metaphor, irony and blending. Argumentum, 10, 611–630.Google Scholar
Peña, M. S., & Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J.
(2017) Construing and constructing hyperbole. In A. Athanasiadou (Ed.), Studies in figurative thought and language (pp. 42–73). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J.
(2000) The role of mappings and domains in understanding metonymy. In A. Barcelona (Ed.), Metaphor and metonymy at the crossroads (pp. 109–132). Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
(2011) Metonymy and cognitive operations. In R. Benczes, A. Barcelona, & F. J. Ruiz de Mendoza (Eds.), Defining metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics. Towards a consensus view (pp. 103–123). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2017a) Cognitive modeling and irony. In H. Colston, & A. Athanasiadou (Eds.), Irony in language use and communication (pp. 179–200). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2017b) Metaphor and other cognitive operations in interaction: from basicity to complexity. In B. Hampe (Ed.), Metaphor: Embodied cognition, and discourse (pp. 138–159). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J., & Galera, A.
(2014) Cognitive Modeling. A linguistic perspective. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2020) The metonymic exploitation of descriptive, attitudinal, and regulatory scenarios in making meaning. In A. Baicchi (Ed.), Figurative meaning construction in thought and language (pp. 283–307). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J., & Lozano, I.
(2019a) Unraveling irony: From linguistics to literary criticism and back. Cognitive Semantics, 5, 147–173. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2019b) A cognitive-linguistic approach to complexity in irony: dissecting the ironic echo. Metaphor and Symbol, 34(2), 127–138. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ruiz de Mendoza, F. J., & Pérez, L.
(2003) Cognitive operations and pragmatic implication. In K. –U. Panther & L. Thornburg (Eds.), Metonymy and pragmatic inferencing (pp. 23–49). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sperber, D., & Wilson, D.
(1981) Irony and the use–mention distinction. In P. Cole (Ed.), Radical pragmatics (pp. 295–318). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
[ p. 41 ]
(1986) Relevance: Communication and cognition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Sullivan, K.
(2013) Frames and constructions in metaphoric language. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wilson, D.
(2006) The pragmatics of verbal irony: Echo or pretence? Lingua, 116, 1722–1743. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2009) Irony and metarepresentation. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics, 21, 183–226.Google Scholar
(2011) Paralells and differences in the treatment of metaphor in Relevance Theory and Cognitive Linguistics. Studia Linguistica, 128, 195–213.Google Scholar
Wilson, D., & Sperber, D.
(2012) Explaining irony. In D. Wilson, & D. Sperber (Eds.), Meaning and relevance (pp. 123–145). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Yus, F.
(2016) Propositional Attitude, Affective Attitude and Irony Comprehension. Pragmatics & Cognition, 23(1), 92–116. CrossrefGoogle Scholar