Narrative Interaction

Editors
| University of Dortmund
| University of Dortmund
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027226457 (Eur) | EUR 105.00
ISBN 9781588115539 (USA) | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027294630 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Telling stories in conversations is intricately interwoven with the interactive and local functions of story telling. Telling stories demands a certain kind of context and in itself establishes a particular interactive reality. Thus, narration is a specific kind of verbal interaction, governed by contextualizing devices, genre-specific cooperative regularities and corresponding verbal features. It plays an important role in institutional as well as in private modes of communication. The volume focuses on narration as a contextualized and contextualizing activity, which allocates specific structural tasks to the participants in the narrative process (narrator, co-narrator, listener). Thus, the research questions are oriented towards story telling under a functional and interactive perspective. The contributions analyze recordings of authentic narrations in different functions using different kinds of qualitative reconstructive methods. The data come from everyday as well as institutional settings and the languages covered are English, German, Greek, Hungarian, and Italian.
[Studies in Narrative, 5]  2005.  vi, 306 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
1. Introduction: Different dimensions in the field of narrative interaction
Tabea Becker and Uta M. Quasthoff
1–11
Part I: Acquiring the world through narrative interaction
13
2. Fantasy stories and conversational narratives of personal experience: Genre-specific, interactional and developmental perspectives
Friederike Kern and Uta M. Quasthoff
15–56
3. The "Two-Puppies" Story: The role of narrative in teaching and learning science
Richard Sohmer and Sarah Michaels
57–91
4. The role of narrative interaction in narrative development
Tabea Becker
93–111
5. Humorous disaster and success stories among female adolescents in Germany
Rebecca Branner
113–147
Part II: The co-construction of narratives
149
6. Construction of self-narrative in a psychotherapeutic setting: An analysis of the mutual determination of narrative perspective taken by patient and therapist
Eszter Beran and Zsolt Unoka
151–167
7. The role of metaphor in the narrative co-construction of collaborative experience
Vera John-Steiner, Christopher Shank and Teresa Meehan
169–195
8. The use of interjections in Italian conversation: The participation of the audience in narratives
Chiara M. Monzoni
197–220
Part III: Retold Stories
221
9. Same old story?: On the interactional dynamics of shared narratives
Alexandra Georgakopoulou
223–241
10. Institutional memories: the narrative retelling of a professionel life
Jenny Cook-Gumperz
243–261
11. Interaction in the telling and retelling of interlaced stories: The co-construction of humorous narratives
Neal R. Norrick
263–283
12. Narrative reconstruction of past experiences: Adjustments and modifications in the process of recontextualizing a past experience
Susanne Günthner
285–301
Index
303
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Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies
BIC Subject: GTC – Communication studies
BISAC Subject: LAN004000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Communication Studies
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2004046406