Crossroads Semantics

Computation, experiment and grammar

Editors
| Aarhus University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027212481 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027265999 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
As language is a multifaceted phenomenon, the study of language, as long as it is geared at providing a comprehensive picture of it, cannot be restricted to one component or one approach. This applies to the many different components of language as well, including semantics.

If we want to fully understand the phenomenon of language meaning, we must not limit our research to lexical semantics, syntax-induced meaning or pragmatics. In order to enable ourselves to construct a consistent account of meaning, we need to extract relevant information from research done in different frameworks and from different theoretical standpoints.

This volume brings together a number of computational, psycholinguistic as well as theoretical studies, which highlight and illustrate how research done in one subfield of linguistics can be relevant to others.

The articles highlight the different ways in which one can work with different aspects of language meaning.

[Not in series, 210]  2017.  viii, 329 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Dedication
Introduction
1–7
Chapter 1. Bridging theoretical and experimental linguistic research
Bobby Ruijgrok
9–20
Data and its use
Chapter 2. Experimental research: Problems and opportunities in the big-data era
Henk Cremers
23–37
Chapter 3. Finding long-distance dependencies in the Lassy Corpus
Gosse Bouma
39–56
Chapter 4. How to compare speed and accuracy of syntactic parsers
Gertjan van Noord
57–76
Chapter 5. Adposition clusters in Dutch
Frank Van Eynde
77–92
Chapter 6. Polarity licensing and intervention by conjunction
Jack Hoeksema
93–106
Chapter 7. Frequential test of (S)OV as unmarked word order in Dutch and German clauses: A serendipitous corpus-linguistic experiment
Gerard Kempen and Karin Harbusch
107–123
Chapter 8. Kratzer’s effect in the nominal domain: Fake indexicals in Dutch and German
Gertjan Postma
125–137
Chapter 9. Is bilingual speech production language-specific or non-specific?: The case of gender congruency in Dutch-English bilinguals
Niels O. Schiller and Rinus G. Verdonschot
139–154
Chapter 10. Prosody of restrictive and appositive relative clauses in Dutch and German
Vincent J. van Heuven and Constantijn Kaland
155–176
Chapter 11. Licensing distributivity: The role of plural morphology
Hanna de Vries
177–189
Implementation and theory building
Chapter 12. Extending categorial grammar to phonology
Marc van Oostendorp
193–205
Chapter 13. Stacking up for the long way down
Marcel den Dikken
207–225
Chapter 14. Meaning between algebra and culture: Auto-antonyms in the Ewe verb lexicon
Felix K. Ameka
227–248
Chapter 15. Whether you like it or not, this is a paper about or not
Ton van der Wouden and Frans Zwarts
249–261
Chapter 16. Between desire and necessity: The complementarity of want and need
Johan Rooryck
263–279
Chapter 17. Inner aspect and the comparative quantifiers
Boban Arsenijević
281–304
Chapter 18. The expressive en maar-construction
Hans Broekhuis and Norbert Corver
305–325
Index
327–329
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN016000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Semantics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016052101