Think-aloud protocol

Riitta Jääskeläinen

Table of contents

The term ‘think-aloud protocol’ refers to a type of research data used in empirical translation process research. The data elicitation method is known as ‘thinking aloud’ or ‘concurrent verbalization’, which means that subjects are asked to perform a task and to verbalize whatever crosses their mind during the task performance. The written transcripts of the verbalizations are called think-aloud protocols (TAPs).

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References

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Further reading

Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
2005Expertise and Explicitation in the Translation Process. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  BoPGoogle Scholar
Göpferich, Susanne
2008Translationsprozessforschung: Stand – Methoden – Perspektiven. Tübingen: Gunter Narr.  TSBGoogle Scholar
Hansen, Gyde
(ed.) 1999Probing the Process in Translation: Methods and Results. Copenhagen Studies in Language 24. Copenhagen: Samfundslitteratur.  TSBGoogle Scholar
Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja & Riitta Jääskeläinen
(eds) 2000Tapping and Mapping the Processes of Translation and Interpreting. Outlooks on Empirical Research. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  BoPGoogle Scholar