Computer-aided translation

Lynne Bowker & Des Fisher
University of Ottawa

Table of contents

Computer-aided translation (CAT) is the use of computer software to assist a human translator in the translation process. The term applies to translation that remains primarily the responsibility of a person, but involves software that can facilitate certain aspects of it. This contrasts with machine translation (MT), which refers to translation that is carried out principally by computer but may involve some human intervention, such as pre- or post-editing. Indeed, it is helpful to conceive of CAT as part of a continuum of translation possibilities, where various degrees of machine or human assistance are possible.

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References

Bey, Youcef, Boitet, Christian & Kageura, Kyo
2008“BEYTrans: A Wiki-based environment for helping online volunteer translators.” In Topics in Language Resources for Translation and Localisation, Elia Yuste Rodrigo (ed.), 135–150. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  TSB
Bowker, Lynne
2006“Translation Memory and Text.” In Lexicography, Terminology and Translation: Text-based Studies in Honour of Ingrid Meyer, Lynne Bowker (ed.), 175–187. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press.
Garcia, Ignacio
2008“Power Shifts in Web-based Translation Memory.” Machine Translation 21 (1): 55–68. Crossref logo  TSB
Gow, Francie
2007“You Must Remember This: The Copyright Conundrum of ‘Translation Memory’ Databases.” In Canadian Journal of Law and Technology 6 (3): 175–192.  TSB. Crossref logo
Jaekel, Gary
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Joscelyne, Andrew
2000“The Role of Translation in an International Organization.” In Translating into Success: Cutting-edge strategies for going multilingual in a global age, Robert C. Sprung (ed.), 81–95. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  TSB
Kay, Martin
1980“The Proper Place of Men and Machines in Language Translation.” Research Report CSL-80–11, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA. Reprinted in Readings in Machine Translation, 2003, Sergei Nirenburg, Harold L. Somers & Yorick A. Wilks (eds), 221–232. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Crossref logo  TSB
Lagoudaki, Elina
2006“Imperial College London Translation Memories Survey 2006. Translation Memory systems: Enlightening users’ perspective.” http://​www3​.imperial​.ac​.uk​/pls​/portallive​/docs​/1​/7307707​.PDF [Accessed on 26 April 2010]. Crossref logo  TSB
Savourel, Yves
2007“CAT Tools and Standards: A Brief Summary.” MultiLingual 18 (6): 37.  TSB. Crossref logo
Topping, Suzanne
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Further reading

Bowker, Lynne
2002Computer-Aided Translation Technology: A Practical Introduction. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press.  TSB
Esselink, Bert
2000A Practical Guide to Localization. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  TSB
Quah, Chiew Kin
2006Translation and Technology. Houndmills, UK & New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref logo  TSB
Somers, Harold
(ed.) 2003Computers and Translation: A Translator’s Guide. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref logo  BoP