Chapter published in:
Intercultural Perspectives on Research Writing
Edited by Pilar Mur-Dueñas and Jolanta Šinkūnienė
[AILA Applied Linguistics Series 18] 2018
► pp. 151172
References

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Murillo, Silvia
2018.  In Intercultural Perspectives on Research Writing [AILA Applied Linguistics Series, 18],  pp. 237 ff. Crossref logo
Povolná, Renata
2020.  In Persuasion in Specialised Discourses,  pp. 229 ff. Crossref logo
Zibalas, Deividas & Jolanta Šinkūnienė
2019. RHETORICAL STRUCTURE OF PROMOTIONAL GENRES: THE CASE OF RESEARCH ARTICLE AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS. Discourse and Interaction 12:2  pp. 95 ff. Crossref logo

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