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Asia-Pacific Language Variation
Vol. 1:2 (2015) ► pp. 190219
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Palfreyman, Nick
2020. Macro and micro-social variation in Asia-Pacific sign languages. Asia-Pacific Language Variation 6:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

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