Gesture and Multimodal Development

Editors
| Université Stendhal - Grenoble 3
| Université Toulouse 2
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202581 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273925 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
We gesture while we talk and children use gestures prior to words to communicate during the first year. Later, as words become the preferred form of communication, children continue to gesture to reinforce or extend the spoken messages or even to replace them. This volume, originally published as a Special Issue of Gesture 10:2/3 (2010), brings together studies from language acquisition and developmental psychology. It provides a review of common theoretical, methodological and empirical themes, and the contributions address topics such as gesture use in prelinguistic infants with a special and new focus on pointing, the relationship between gestures and lexical development in typically developing and deaf children and even how gesture can help to learn mathematics. All in all, it brings additional evidence on how gestures are related to language, communication and mind development.
[Benjamins Current Topics, 39]  2012.  xii, 223 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
About the authors
vii–x
Introduction
Gesture and multimodal development
Michèle Guidetti and Jean-Marc Colletta
1–6
Articles
Pointing gesture in young children: Hand preference and language development
Hélène Cochet and Jacques Vauclair
7–26
Support or competition?: Dynamic development of the relationship between manual pointing and symbolic gestures from 6 to 18 months of age
Claire D. Vallotton
27–48
From gesture to sign and from gesture to word: Pointing in deaf and hearing children
Aliyah Morgenstern, Stéphanie Caët, Marie Collombel-Leroy, Fanny Limousin and Marion Blondel
49–78
How the hands control attention during early word learning
Nancy de Villiers Rader and Patricia Zukow-Goldring
79–98
Infant movement as a window into language processing
Laurel Fais, Julia Leibowich, Ladan Hamadani and Lana Ohira
99–127
Children’s lexical skills and task demands affect gestural behavior in mothers of late-talking children and children with typical language development
Angela Grimminger, Katharina Rohlfing and Prisca Stenneken
129–155
The type of shared activity shapes caregiver and infant communication
Daniel Puccini, Mireille Hassemer, Dorothé Salomo and Ulf Liszkowski
157–174
Transcribing and annotating multimodality: How deaf children’s productions call into the question the analytical tools
Agnès Millet and Isabelle Estève
175–197
Mathematical learning and gesture: Character viewpoint and observer viewpoint in students’ gestured graphs of functions
Susan Gerofsky
199–220
221–223
“This collection of papers presents a wonderful and vast overview of contemporary research on gesture and multimodal development, representing multiple theoretical and applied perspectives. [...] It constitutes a major contribution not only to the study of gestural and multimodal development, but also to the understanding of cognitive and communicative development in a more broad sense.”
“Looking at a variety of languages, input conditions, and contexts of language use, these researchers demonstrate how language development is necessarily embodied and multimodal. These studies present exciting new insights into the dynamic relationships that are necessary for language development.”
“All of the articles in the book provide valuable insights into different aspects of the role of gesture and multimodality in children’s communicative and cognitive development. The book as a whole reflects the state of the art in this field of research and constitutes one among relatively few anthologies on this topic (e.g. Guidetti & Nicoladis, 2008; Gullberg & de Bot, 2010; Iverson & Goldin-Meadow, 1998; Volterra & Erting,1990), which is valuable in itself.

Cited by

Cited by other publications

Capobianco, Micaela, Elena Antinoro Pizzuto & Antonella Devescovi
2017. Gesture–speech combinations and early verbal abilities. Interaction Studies 18:1  pp. 55 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2012010743