Conference Interpreting – A Trainer’s Guide

HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027258632 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027258649 | EUR 36.00 | USD 54.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027267566 | EUR 99.00/36.00*
| USD 149.00/54.00*
 
This companion volume to Conference Interpreting – A Complete Course provides additional recommendations and theoretical and practical discussion for instructors, course designers and administrators. Chapters mirroring the Complete Course offer supplementary exercises, tips on materials selection, classroom practice, feedback and class morale, realistic case studies from professional practice, and a detailed rationale for each stage supported by critical reviews of the literature. Dedicated chapters address the role of theory and research in interpreter training, with outline syllabi for further qualification in interpreting studies at MA or PhD level; the current state of testing and professional certification, with proposals for an overhaul; the institutional and administrative challenges of running a high-quality training course; and designs and opportunities for further and teacher training, closing with a brief speculative look at future prospects for the profession.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 121]  2016.  xxxiv, 650 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
xix–xx
General introduction
xxi–xxviii
xxix
1. Introduction
1–8
2. Teaching conference interpreting
9–56
3. Curriculum and progression
57–102
4. Selection and admission
103–142
5. Initiation to interpreting
143–168
6. Teaching consecutive interpreting
169–214
7. Language, knowledge and working into B
215–242
8. Teaching simultaneous interpreting
243–300
9. Reality and advanced tasks
301–338
10. Professionalism and ethics
339–372
11. Testing and certification
373–464
12. Theory and research in interpreter training
465–514
13. Institutional issues
515–566
14. Lifelong and teacher training
567–590
15. Conclusions and future prospects
591–602
References
603–630
Index
631–???
“Extraordinarily comprehensive and meticulous.”
“The language is impeccable, with frequent metaphors that will make the reader smile and a style that even non-native speakers will find very readable. In addition, layout is attractive: overviews or brief explanations of selected points are set off from the body of the text in a reader-friendly box format, with sensible highlighting of ideas for further reading (full details of which can be found in the bibliography at the end of each volume). [...]

For students, the CC volume is definitely attractive and informative [...]. Students will be better able to reflect upon what they do and why their trainers choose specific exercises for them. For trainers, it is advisable to have both volumes – not on their bookshelves, but on their office desks. Whenever they are in doubt about how to organize their courses and what material to use, a look into either volume will provide them with more suggestions than they will ever be in a position to put into practice.”
“These books undoubtedly need to be in the library of any professional conference interpreter and are a must read for interpretation students. [...] The books cover in their scope all major aspects of teaching conference interpretation: until now there was no such attempt so the books are indeed unique. Each topic is sufficiently detailed and the books objectively describe established practices as well as controversies [...]. Currently teaching conference interpretation – in my opinion – depends heavily on standards and rules of a particular educational institution or a particular instructor. The Trainer’s Guide is a unique attempt if not to standardize then to summarize logically and clearly methods and techniques of teaching. It is not possible to go into all details in an Amazon review but the book will be an invaluable training aid for any serious interpreter trainer worldwide. The Complete Course is somewhat smaller in size (470 pages) but is no less comprehensive. Geared more towards students than trainers, it covers duties and responsibilities of an interpreter, prerequisites and exercises, initiation to interpreting. It is a highly practical volume that will be useful in class and outside of it. [...] Both books are truly unique and complete – a real treat for trainers and students and interpreters.”
“This book, together with volume one, forms a coherent whole, highlighting the symbiotic relationship between trainees and trainers in interpreter training. Readers will appreciate the book’s practicality and systematically designed course modules and exercises, which can be used both in and outside the classroom. Given the demands of the conference interpreting profession and the scarcity of high-quality textbooks on interpreter training, this book will undoubtedly be of great value for interpreter trainers, course designers and researchers.”
“The authors' efforts are unprecedented in scale and they have produced a set of works that give the most comprehensive summary of the best practices in conference interpreter training to date. The comprehensive nature of their deliberations means that an interpreter trainer can start from their books before expanding their perusal to wider and more in-depth reading for their practice in the classroom.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

CARBONELL AGUERO, Leire
2017. La formación de los alumnos de interpretación del Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) para poder llegar a trabajar en organizaciones internacionales. CLINA: Revista Interdisciplinaria de Traducción, Interpretación y Comunicación Intercultural 3:2  pp. 19 ff. Crossref logo
Chmiel, Agnieszka, Przemysław Janikowski & Anna Cieślewicz
2020. The eye or the ear?. Interpreting. International Journal of Research and Practice in Interpreting Crossref logo
Chmiel, Agnieszka, Agnieszka Lijewska, Agnieszka Szarkowska & Łukasz Dutka
2018. Paraphrasing in respeaking – comparing linguistic competence of interpreters, translators and bilinguals. Perspectives 26:5  pp. 725 ff. Crossref logo
Gallai, Fabrizio
2017. Pragmatic competence and interpreter-mediated police investigative interviews. The Translator 23:2  pp. 177 ff. Crossref logo
Han, Chao & Qin Fan
2020. Using self-assessment as a formative assessment tool in an English-Chinese interpreting course: student views and perceptions of its utility. Perspectives 28:1  pp. 109 ff. Crossref logo
Malenova, Evgeniya
2018. Academic teaching in Translation and Interpreting in Russia: Student expectations and market reality. English Studies at NBU 4:2  pp. 101 ff. Crossref logo
Orlando, Marc
2019. Training and educating interpreter and translator trainers as practitioners-researchers-teachers. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 13:3  pp. 216 ff. Crossref logo
SANTAMARÍA CIORDIA, Leticia
2017. La implementación eficaz de entornos virtuales de aprendizaje colaborativo para la formación de intérpretes. CLINA: Revista Interdisciplinaria de Traducción, Interpretación y Comunicación Intercultural 3:1  pp. 35 ff. Crossref logo
Sawyer, David B., Frank Austermühl & Vanessa Enríquez Raído
2019.  In The Evolving Curriculum in Interpreter and Translator Education [American Translators Association Scholarly Monograph Series, XIX],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Shao, Zhangminzi & Mingjiong Chai
2020. The effect of cognitive load on simultaneous interpreting performance: an empirical study at the local level. Perspectives  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Su, Wei
2020. Exploring how rubric training influences students’ assessment and awareness of interpreting. Language Awareness 29:2  pp. 178 ff. Crossref logo
VERMEIREN, Hildegard
2016. Interpretar del neerlandés (L1) al español (L4) - Propuestas pedagógicas. CLINA: Revista Interdisciplinaria de Traducción, Interpretación y Comunicación Intercultural 2:2  pp. 91 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 04 july 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

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Erratum

Due to a mishap in production the diagram on page 299 was published in black and white in the print edition of the book. Please find the colour version here .

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015042297