Chapter published in:
Interpreting in Legal and Healthcare Settings: Perspectives on research and training
Edited by Eva N.S. Ng and Ineke H.M. Crezee
[Benjamins Translation Library 151] 2020
► pp. 118
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2021.  In Introduction to Healthcare for Russian-speaking Interpreters and Translators, Crossref logo

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