Current Issues in the Phonetic Sciences

Proceedings of the IPS-77 Congress, Miami Beach, Florida, 17–19 December 1977

Editors
| University of Florida, Gainesville
| University of Florida, Gainesville
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027209108 | EUR 265.00 | USD 398.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027281265 | EUR 265.00 | USD 398.00
 
These papers, from the IPS-77 Congress held in Miami Beach, Florida in 1977, present the state-of-the-art in phonetic science. The volume is subdivided into twelve sections: History of Phonetics, Issues of Method and Theory in Phonetics, Laryngeal Function, Temporal Factors and Intonation, Physiological and Acoustic Phonetics, Speech Production, Neurophonetics and Psychopathology, Speech Perception, Speech and Speaker Recognition, Teaching Phonetics, Children’s Speech and Language Acquisition, and Special Issues in Phonetics.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 9]  1979.  xxi, 587pp., xiii, 608 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Editor’s foreword
v–vii
List of congress sponsors, committees and other organizational matters
vii–xi
Part I: A. History of phonetics
Ancient arab and muslim phoneticians: An appraisal of their contribution to phonetics
Muhammad Hasan Bakalla
3–11
Phonetics and other disciplines: then and now
Arthur J. Bronstein and Lawrence J. Raphael
13–21
Toward a historiography of phonetics
E.F.K. Koerner
23–35
Giulio Panconcelli-Calzias Beitrag zur geschichte der phonetik
Jens-Peter Koester
37–47
Looking back: memories of 40 years in phonetics
Elbert R. Moses
49–54
B. Issues of method and theory in phonetics
On the necessity of the introduction of technical principles into instrumental-phonetic investigation
Uzbek Baitchura
57–61
Some control components of a speech production model
R.A.W. Bladon
63–70
Phonetic aspects of lingua-informatics
E.A. Krasheninnikova
71–76
Dimension statistique de la structure linguistique et distinction phonétique/phonologie
Morteza Mahmoudian
77–84
Linguistics and systems theory
Mehra M. Mehan
85–92
Some problems in phonetic theory
Marcel A.A. Tatham
93–106
C. Laryngeal function
Caractéristique de forme de l’onde de débit des cordes vocales: productions vocaliques
Louis-Jean Boë
109–118
Laryngeal patterns of consonant productions in sentence observed with an impedance glottograph
Gérard F. Chollet and Joel C. Kahane
119–128
Physiological functions of the larynx in phonetic control
Osamu Fujimura
129–163
A cross language study of laryngeal adjustment in consonant production
Hajime Hirose, Hirohide Yoshioka and Seiji Niimi
165–179
Quantitative analysis of chant in relation to normal phonation and vocal fry
John Large and Thomas Murry
181–189
Jointure et activité glottale
Magnus Petursson
191–200
Instrumental measurement of phonetion types: A laryngographic contribution
Peter J. Roach and William J. Hardcastle
201–207
Variations of pitch and intensity with pre-phonatory laryngeal adjustments
Ingo R. Titze
209–215
Physical and physiological dimensions of intrinsic voice quality
Ingo R. Titze
217–223
D. Temporal factors and questions of intonation
Applied prosodic analysis: A pedagogical model for english and german intonation
Keith O. Anderson
227–234
Rhythm and pause as means of expression in the japanese arts of storytelling, with special regard to rakugo
Heinz Balkenhol
235–243
Artistic vocal communication at the prosodic level
Ivan Fónagy
245–260
Syllabic division and the intonation of common slavic
Herbert Galton
261–265
Processes in the development of speech timing slavic
Sarah Hawkins
267–278
An acoustical/temporal analysis of the effect of situational stress on speech
J.W. Hicks, Jr.
279–284
A statistical approach to the problem of isochrony in spoken british english
D.R. Hill, Wiktor Jassem and I.H. Witten
285–294
Intonation through visualization
E.F. James
295–301
Tonal spelling
Bienming Jou
303–308
Quelques problèmes posés par l’élaboration de règles prédictives de l’intonation
Elisabeth L’Hote
309–319
Prephonological views on the history of english syllable accents
Anatoly Liberman
321–329
Syllable timing in spanish, english, and finnish
D. Kimbrough Oller
331–343
Le registre mélodique de l’attaque dans un parler franco-ontarien
Yvette Szmidt
345–355
“Mélodie-language” des chorals de Jean-Sébastien Bach
Anne-Marie Ferrand Vidal
357–362
Temproal cues in french intervocalic stops
Max Wajskop
363–382
Principes d’une méthode d’enseignement de la prononciation de français à partir du rythme de la langue parlée non méridionale
François Wioland
383–404
E. Physiological and acoustic phonetics
Description of an Electropalatographic system
D. Autesserre and B. Teston
407–420
Inadequacies in phonetic specifications of some latyngeal features: evidence from hindi
R. Prakash Dixit
423–433
Vocalic variability in palatographic impressions
Solomon I. Sara S.J.
435–442
A new portable type unit for electropalatography
Seiji Shibata, A. Ino, Sayoko Yamashita, S. Hiki, S. Kiritani and M. Sawashima
443–449
Aspiration in Scottish gealic stop consonants
Cynthia R. Shuken
451–458
The effect on formant patterns of differential volumetric change in the oral cavity
Peter S. Vig and James B. McLain
459–474
Characteristics of oral air flow during plosive consonant production by hearing-impaired speakers
Robert L. Whitehead and Kenneth O. Jones
475–485
F. Speech production
the production and recognition of sounds in english words spoken by young japanese adults
John W. Black, Yukio Takefuta and Elizabeth Jancosek
489–500
The production of laterals: some acoustic properties and their physiological implications
R.A.W. Bladon
501–508
African click sounds: early descriptions and symbols
G.H. Breckwoldt
509–520
Nasal consonant epenthesis in ‘southern’ french
E. Dean Detrich
521–529
An instrumental investigation of coarticulation in stop consonant sequences
William J. Hardcastle and Peter J. Roach
531–540
Standardisation vs. diversification dans la pronounciation du français contemporain
Pierre R. Leon
541–549
On vowel-diphthong transitions
John M. Lipski
551–561
Speech across a linguistic boundary: category naming and phonetic description
Leigh Lisker
563–571
Comparative analysis of syllable and accent between english and japanese
William A. Sakow
573–576
Original vowels in african languages
Roman Stopa
577–582
Vowel length in micmac and malecite
László Szabó
583–587
Part II: G. Neurophonetics and psychopathology
Differential diagnosis of neurologic and psychogenic voice disorders
Arnold E. Aronson
591–597
Speech studies in psychiatric populations
John K. Darby and Alice Sherk
599–608
Acoustic comparisons of psychotic and non-psychotic voices
Harry Hollien and John K. Darby
609–614
The physiology of cerebellar involvement in motor control
Torgny Jeneskog and Carl-Gustaf Söderberg
615–620
Neural mechanism in speech productions
Peter F. MacNeilage
621–638
Impairment of verbal and non-verbal oral movements after left hemisphere damage
Catherine A. Mateer
639–645
Psychiatric implications of speech disorder
Peter F. Ostwald
647–656
Phonetic indications of psychopathology
Clyde L. Rousey
657–667
Cerebellar involvement in motor control: a concept
Carl-Gustaf Söderberg
669–673
H. Speech perception
On the recognition of isolated spanish vowels
Ana María Borzone de Manrique
677–681
Experiments in voice confrontation
G.H. Breckwoldt
683–690
The effects of several linguistic factors on the magnitude of error in the location of extraneous sounds embedded in speech
Glen L. Bull
691–697
Normalization influenceeees in the perception of speech
Conrad LaRiviere
699–712
Some physiological interpretations of the perception: Implications of an experiment on the perception of segmented speech
John Oakeshott-Taylor
713–719
Perception of speech features by persons with hearing impairment
James M. Pickett
721–736
Auditory phonetics
Herbert Pilch
737–741
The effect of labov’s five phonological variables on perceived listener judgement
Irwin Ronson
743–754
Cross-language differences in the perceptual use of voicing cues
Willy Serniclaes and Max Wajskop
755–773
Intelligibility of time-altered sentenial messages as a function of contralateral masking
Debra M. van Ort, Daniel S. Beasley and Linda L. Riensche
775–785
The perception of distinctive features
Michel Viel
787–799
I. Speech and speaker recognition
Some steps in performance evaluation of the dawid speech recognition system
R.D. Glave
803–810
The effect of disguise on speaker identification from sound spectrograms
Kathleen Houlihan
811–828
Speaker identification by Wojciech Majewski, Janusz Zalewski, and Harry Hollien: Some remarks on different speaker identification techniques
Charles C. Johnson, Jr.
829–835
Further analysis of talkers with similar sounding voices
Howard B. Rothman
837–846
Preliminary data on dialect in speech disguise
Donna A. Tate
847–850
An objective method of voice identification
Oscar Tosi, R. Pisani, R. Dubes and A. Jain
851–861
J. The teaching of phonetics
Phonetics and second language teaching in Africa
F.O. Bennett
865–870
teaching beginning phonetics in the united states: some basic considerations
Jacqueline L. Brown
871–875
Non-english phone imitation and general academic and IPA transcription performance by monolingual adults
Raphael M. Haller
877–881
the teaching of english phonetics in the U.S.A.: issues related to speech pathology and theatre
Telete Zorayda Lawrence
883–889
the teaching of english phonetics in the U.S.A.: foreign dialects
Audrey O’Brien
891–892
Teaching phonetics in the voice and diction course
Betty R. Owens
893–898
The teaching of english phoneetics in the United states
Sadanah Singh and Jeffrey L. Danhauer
899–903
A perception test as a diagnostic tool in teaching german pronunciation
Rudolf Weiss
905–916
K. Children’s speech and language acquisition
Development of ‘nuclear accent’ marking in children’s phrases
George D. Allen, Sarah Hawkins and Margaret R. Morris
919–926
Trochaic rhythm in children’s speech
George D. Allen and Sarah Hawkins
927–933
Supraglottal air pressure variations associated with consonant productions by children
W.S. Brown, Jr.
935–944
An indicator of the onset of puberty in males
E. Thomas Doherty and Harry Hollien
945–953
Some competencies influencing phoneme acquisition in children
Raphael M. Haller
955–960
Timing relationships and strategies used by normal speaking children in the self-regulation of speaking rate
E. Charles Healy
961–966
What the child’s perception of the word-final obstruent cognates tells us about hiss perceptual mastery of english phonology
Jo Ann Williamson Higgs and Barbara Williams Hodson
967–976
A right ear effect for auditory feedback contro of children’s newly- acquired phonemes
Walter H. Manning and Linda L. Louko
977–984
An examination of the articulatory acquisition of swedisch phonemes
Stuart I. Ritterman and Ulla E.M. Richtner
985–996
Observer reliability in making impressionistic judgments of early vocalization
Ida J. Stockman, David Woods and Abraham Tishman
997–1008
Interference and the persistence of articulatory responses
Harris Winitz and Betty Bellerose
1009–1016
L. Special issues in phonetics
Transcription of the american /r/
George D. Allen
1019–1025
Alphabets, orthographies, and the influence of social historical factors
Uzbek Baitchura
1027–1037
Visible speech Cues and sndhi variation rules in french
Simon Belasco
1039–1052
Effects of masking on subvocal speech and short-term memory
Curt Hamre and William Harn
1053–1056
The effects of masking on apraxia: evidence from spectrographic data
Curt Hamre and William Harn
1057–1063
Experiments and observation made using a real-time spectrum analyzer (RTA): One formant vowels and formant merger
Antti Iivonen
1065–1074
Speech synthesis by rule using the fove program
Frances Ingeman
1075–1084
On the history of quantity in germanic
Anatoly Liberman
1085–1090
Automatic location of stressed syllabels in french
Philippe Martin
1091–1094
Acoustic cues and consonant clusters
Frank Parker
1095–1104
Phonetic and interdisciplinary new perspectives in paralinguistic studies
Fernando Poyatos
1105–1116
Interactions between intensity glides and frequency glissandos
Mario Rossi
1117–1130
La fusion des voyelles en frontières inter-syntagmatiques et intra-syntagmatiques
Laurent Santerre
1131–1138
Speculations on an contact-induced phonological change in gallo-italian
Gladys E. Saunders
1139–1147
A short memory strategy with distinctive features
James Monroe Stewart and Carol Barach
1149–1159
The analysis of the combinations of distinctive sounds
Ana Tataru
1161–1170
La spectrographie et la segmantation acoustique au service de la poétique expérimetale: Des analyses fondées sur le dictionnaire de poétique et de rhétorique de Henri Morrier (éd. de 1975)
Sibylle Vater
1171–1185
Prosodic features and speech acts
Areta Voroniuc
1187–1196
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Koerner, E. F. Konrad
1993. Historiography of Phonetics: the State of the Art. Journal of the International Phonetic Association 23:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

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Subjects

Linguistics

Phonetics
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  79322105