Variation in the Caribbean

From creole continua to individual agency

Editors
| University of Texas at Austin
| University of the West Indies, St. Augustine
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027252593 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027287397 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 

The study of linguistic variation in the Caribbean has been central to the emergence of Pidgin and Creole Linguistics as an academic field. It has yielded influential theory, such as the (post-)creole continuum or the 'Acts of Identity' models, that has shaped sociolinguistics far beyond creole settings. This volume collects current work in the field and focuses on methodological and theoretical innovations that continue, expand, and update the dialog between Caribbean variation studies and general sociolinguistics.

[Creole Language Library, 37]  2011.  vi, 276 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
Lars Hinrichs and Joseph T. Farquharson
1–9
Part I. Variation and linguistic systems
Revisiting variation between sa and o in Sranan
Donald Winford
13–38
Inherent variability and coexistent systems: Negation in Bequia
James A. Walker and Jack Sidnell
39–56
Putting individuals back in contact: Accommodation strategies by Barbadians in Ipswich
Michelle C. Braña-Straw
57–78
Relative markers in spoken Standard Jamaican English
Ulrike Gut
79–104
Part II. Variation and identity
“Flying at half-mast”? Voices, genres, and orthographies in Barbadian Creole*
Janina Fenigsen
107–132
The creole continuum and individual agency: Approaches to stylistic variation in Jamaica
Dagmar Deuber
133–162
Language attitudes and linguistic awareness in Jamaican English
Andrea Sand
163–188
Part III. Variation and the community
The varilingual repertoire of Tobagonian speakers
Valerie Youssef
191–206
On the emergence of new language varieties: The case of the Eastern Maroon Creole in French Guiana
Bettina Migge and Isabelle Léglise
207–230
‘Creole’ and youth language in a British inner-city community
Susan Dray and Mark Sebba
231–250
Le Page’s theoretical and applied legacy in sociolinguistics and creole studies
John R. Rickford
251–272
Name index
273–274
Subject index
275–276
“This volume offers fresh and exciting insights into one of the hotspots of English around the world. It is a must-read for anyone interested in contact linguistics at large and language variation in the Caribbean in particular - highly recommended!”
“This important volume stands out by being both focused and far-reaching in its treatment of variation in pidgin and creole languages. With this edited volume, Hinrichs and Farquharson revivify the central role of variation in creole studies. They do so by bringing dominant strands of current work in quantitative sociolinguistics to bear on creole languages, namely the role of variation in contact linguistics and likewise the role of variation in the study of language and identity. Several articles in the volume aptly expand the social realm of creole studies by focusing on creole societies in diaspora.”
“This is an important book that scholars and their students working within both the world Englishes and Creole Studies frameworks will find very useful.”
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2011. PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. Language in Society 40:5  pp. 679 ff. Crossref logo
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2018.  In Translating the Female Self across Cultures [Benjamins Translation Library, 130], Crossref logo
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2019.  In Variation, Versatility and Change in Sociolinguistics and Creole Studies,  pp. 174 ff. Crossref logo
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2018.  In Multilingual Youth Practices in Computer Mediated Communication, Crossref logo
Schleef, Erik
2019.  In The Cambridge Handbook of World Englishes,  pp. 609 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFB – Sociolinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2010043364