Article published in:
Dialogue in Multilingual and Multimodal Communities
Edited by Dale Koike and Carl S. Blyth
[Dialogue Studies 27] 2015
► pp. 79103
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Huensch, Amanda
2017. How the initiation and resolution of repair sequences act as a device for the co-construction of membership and identity. Pragmatics and Society 8:3  pp. 355 ff. Crossref logo
Huth, Thorsten, Emma Betz & Carmen Taleghani-Nikazm
2019. Rethinking language teacher training: steps for making talk-in-interaction research accessible to practitioners. Classroom Discourse 10:1  pp. 99 ff. Crossref logo

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