Language as Dialogue

From rules to principles of probability

| University of Muenster
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027210227 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027288882 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
With her theory of ‘Language as Dialogue’, Edda Weigand has opened up a new and promising perspective in linguistic research and its neighbouring disciplines. Her model of ‘competence-in-performance’ solved the problem of how to bridge the gap between competence and performance and thus substantially shaped the way in which people look at language today.

This book traces Weigand’s linguistic career from its beginning to today and comprises a selection of articles which take the reader on a vivid and fascinating journey through the most important stages of her theorizing. The initial stage when a model of communicative competence was developed is followed by a gradual transition period which finally resulted in the theory of the dialogic action game as a mixed game or the Mixed Game Model. The articles cover a wide range of linguistic topics including, among others, speech act theory, lexical semantics, utterance grammar, emotions, the media, rhetoric and institutional communication. Editorial introductions give further information on the origin and theoretical background of the articles included.
[Dialogue Studies, 5]  2009.  viii, 410 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
Sebastian Feller
1–4
Introduction: In the tide of change
Sebastian Feller
5–12
Origins of the essays
13–16
Part I. 
Language as dialogue in a theory of communicative competence
Introduction to Part I
Sebastian Feller
19–20
The dialogic principle revisited: Speech acts and mental states
21–44
Discourse, conversation, dialogue
45–70
Looking for the point of the dialogic turn
71–94
Words and their role in language use
95–112
Lexical units and syntactic structures: Words, phrases, and utterances considered from a comparative viewpoint
113–128
Rhetoric and argumentation in a dialogic perspective
129–144
Part II. 
At the crossroads
Introduction to Part II
Sebastian Feller
147–148
The unit beyond the sentence
149–156
Coherence in discourse: A never-ending problem
157–164
Emotions in dialogue
165–180
Dialogue in the grip of the media
181–200
Patterns and beyond in dialogic interaction: Basic issues in language technology
201–218
Patterns and beyond in lexical semantics: The issue of word meaning in language technology
219–240
The end of certainty in dialogue analysis
241–258
Part III. 
Language as dialogue in a theory of communicative competence-in-performance
Introduction to Part III
Sebastian Feller
261–264
The dialogic action game
265–282
Dialogue Analysis 2000: Towards a human linguistics
283–294
Possibilities and limitations of corpus linguistics
295–308
Dialogue and teaching in multicultural settings
309–322
Principles of dialogue: With a special focus on business dialogues
323–340
Dialogue: Text and context
341–356
The argumentative power of words: Or how to move people’s minds with words
357–378
A look beyond
Sebastian Feller
379–380
References
381–396
General index
397–402
List of Edda Weigand’s publications
403–410
“In a distinguished career of research, teaching and writing, Edda Weigand has covered a wider range of topics than most of us. Versed in a variety of disciplines and always open to new ideas, she has developed her Mixed Game Model, the view that only the mind engaged in dialogue can enrich reflection. It has guided her in ground-breaking studies which aim to integrate the cognitive and the discourse approach and to reconcile the social nature of communication with its biological foundations. This book will certainly inspire its readers to rethink language.”
“It is extremely interesting, even fascinating to follow the consistent progress of the scholarly thoughts of professor Edda Weigand, as presented in the three parts of the present selection of her contributions. She ranks among those linguists for whom ‘language’ is not a rigid system of strict rules and items, but is grasped as a vivid organism, a complex (holistic) communicative system used by humans in real-life settings, in turn embedded in the sociobiological matrix (cf. her Mixed Game Model). From such a demanding background, all her points of scientific interest, followed by their elaboration in a number of deep analyses, concepts or projects, may be derived; namely: language as dialogue, dialogic action games, the principle of ‘competence-in-performance’ (happily bridging the problematic gap between the two), emotions in dialogue interaction, the postulate of a sociobiology of language (showing her interdisciplinary orientation). Her work is based on the analysis of concrete, vivid language material (often with contrastive comparisons with other languages) and consequently takes account of language users in particular communicative domains and interactive situations (argumentation, business, the media). The title of the final contribution in the present selection “The argumentative power of words or how to move people’s minds with words” appears indicative of Weigand’s appreciation of the phenomenon ‘language’.”
Language as Dialogue is a book with a strong voice. It is Edda Weigand's voice, arguing for a decisively different understanding of language. [...] Edda Weigand's book is inspiring, it is a rich resource to think seriously about the dialogicality of language.”
“Edda Weigand has an exceptionally strong feel for the many-sidedness of what actually goes on when language is being used. On the one hand, people are social beings, who cultivate received ways of doing things. On the other hand, they are individuals, with their own goals. On the one hand, these individual goals are partly a matter of biology. On the other hand, biological imperatives are tempered by ethical considerations – politeness, for instance, can involve an element of positive respect for the human other. On the one hand, people say or write what is important to them personally. On the other hand, their utterances have addressivity – so much so, that any process of communication is in principle dialogical, even when apparently in the form of a monologue. On the one hand, words have meanings, and are combined into meaningful utterances, and utterances into meaningful texts. On the other hand, meaning is never more than just one ingredient in an interchange, and is context-specific and even negotiable, whether intra- or interculturally. Over the years, Weigand’s theorizing has made all such paradoxes, and their far-reaching consequences, ever more boldly explicit. And that is why her work can appeal to linguists, psychologists, sociologists, biologists and humanists – not least literary scholars – from so many different backgrounds.”
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2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 45 ff. Crossref logo
Agyekum, Kofi
2017. The language of Akan herbal drug sellers and advertisers. Language and Dialogue 7:3  pp. 360 ff. Crossref logo
Bertau, Marie-Cécile
2014. Exploring language as the “in-between”. Theory & Psychology 24:4  pp. 524 ff. Crossref logo
Bertau, Marie-Cécile
2014. Introduction: The self within the space–time of language performance. Theory & Psychology 24:4  pp. 433 ff. Crossref logo
Bertau, Marie-Cécile
2014. On displacement. Theory & Psychology 24:4  pp. 442 ff. Crossref logo
Black, Laura W.
2015.  In The International Encyclopedia of Language and Social Interaction,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Bondi, Marina
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 137 ff. Crossref logo
Bondi, Marina
2018. Blogs as interwoven polylogues. Language and Dialogue 8:1  pp. 43 ff. Crossref logo
Capone, Alessandro
2016.  In The Pragmatics of Indirect Reports [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 8],  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Capone, Alessandro
2016.  In The Pragmatics of Indirect Reports [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 8],  pp. 121 ff. Crossref logo
Capone, Alessandro
2016.  In The Pragmatics of Indirect Reports [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 8],  pp. 321 ff. Crossref logo
Capone, Alessandro
2018.  In Further Advances in Pragmatics and Philosophy [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 18],  pp. 97 ff. Crossref logo
Caronia, Letizia
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 83 ff. Crossref logo
Caronia, Letizia & Franca Orletti
2019. The agency of language in institutional talk. Language and Dialogue 9:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Cañada, Maria Dolors & Carmen López-Ferrero
2019. Oral discourse competence-in-performance. Language and Dialogue 9:2  pp. 236 ff. Crossref logo
Chovanec, Jan
2017. Review of Gil-Salom, Luz & Carmen Soler-Monreal, eds. (2014) Dialogicity in Written Specialised Genres . English Text Construction 10:1  pp. 165 ff. Crossref logo
Colomina-Almiñana, Juan J.
2015. Disagreement and the speaker’s point of view. Language and Dialogue 5:2  pp. 224 ff. Crossref logo
Cooren, François
2018. Edda Weigand (ed.). 2017. The Routledge Handbook of Language and Dialogue. Language and Dialogue 8:3  pp. 468 ff. Crossref logo
Feller, Sebastian
2014.  In Communicating Certainty and Uncertainty in Medical, Supportive and Scientific Contexts [Dialogue Studies, 25],  pp. 99 ff. Crossref logo
Flowerdew, John
2014.  In Dialogicity in Written Specialised Genres [Dialogue Studies, 23],  pp. ix ff. Crossref logo
Grein, Marion
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 61 ff. Crossref logo
Grein, Marion
2018. Foreign language teaching – Integrationism vs. MGM. Language and Dialogue 8:1  pp. 5 ff. Crossref logo
Hoinărescu, Liliana
2018. Definition as an argumentative strategy in parliamentary discourse. Language and Dialogue 8:2  pp. 209 ff. Crossref logo
Hou, Junping, Marjolijn Verspoor & Hanneke Loerts
2016. An exploratory study into the dynamics of Chinese L2 writing development. Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics 5:1  pp. 65 ff. Crossref logo
Jones, Peter E.
2018. Integrationist reflections on the place of dialogue in our communicational universe. Language and Dialogue 8:1  pp. 118 ff. Crossref logo
Lam, Phoenix W.Y.
2015. Stanca Măda and Răzvan Săftoiu (eds.) Professional Communication across Languages and Cultures. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, vi + 284 pp. Pragmatics and Society 6:1  pp. 147 ff. Crossref logo
Lejeune, Guillaume
2014.  In Literature as Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 22],  pp. 251 ff. Crossref logo
Linell, Per
2014. Interactivities, intersubjectivities and language: On dialogism and phenomenology. Language and Dialogue 4:2  pp. 165 ff. Crossref logo
Linell, Per
2017. Dialogue, dialogicality and interactivity. Language and Dialogue 7:3  pp. 301 ff. Crossref logo
Livnat, Zohar & Beverly A. Lewin
2016. The interpersonal strand of political speech. Language and Dialogue 6:2  pp. 275 ff. Crossref logo
Létourneau, Alain
2018.  In Dialogic Ethics [Dialogue Studies, 30],  pp. 127 ff. Crossref logo
Purmohammad, Mehdi
2015. Linguistic alignment in L1–L2 dialogue. Language and Dialogue 5:2  pp. 312 ff. Crossref logo
Romenti, Stefania, Chiara Valentini, Grazia Murtarelli & Katia Meggiorin
2016. Measuring online dialogic conversations’ quality: a scale development. Journal of Communication Management 20:4  pp. 328 ff. Crossref logo
Salam El-Dakhs, Dina Abdel
2018. Saying “Yes” and “No” to requests. Language and Dialogue 8:2  pp. 235 ff. Crossref logo
Salam El-Dakhs, Dina Abdel, Jawaher Nasser Al-Haqbani, Manal A. Althaqafi & Shorouq Al-Fouzan
2019. How do Saudis complain?. Language and Dialogue 9:2  pp. 264 ff. Crossref logo
Soler-Monreal, Carmen & Luz Gil-Salom
2014.  In Dialogicity in Written Specialised Genres [Dialogue Studies, 23],  pp. 23 ff. Crossref logo
Suau-Jiménez, Francisca
2014.  In Dialogicity in Written Specialised Genres [Dialogue Studies, 23],  pp. 137 ff. Crossref logo
Săftoiu, Răzvan & Adrian Toader
2018. The persuasive use of pronouns in action games of election campaigns. Language and Dialogue 8:1  pp. 21 ff. Crossref logo
Vasilescu, Andra
2016.  In Pragmemes and Theories of Language Use [Perspectives in Pragmatics, Philosophy & Psychology, 9],  pp. 305 ff. Crossref logo
Wei, Jing
2016.  In Theme and Thematic Progression in Chinese College Students’ English Essays,  pp. 9 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2015.  In Persuasive Games in Political and Professional Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 26],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2015. Dialogue in the stream of life. Language and Dialogue 5:2  pp. 197 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2016. How to verify a theory of dialogue. Language and Dialogue 6:3  pp. 349 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2017. IADA history. Language and Dialogue 7:1  pp. 63 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 5 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2018. The theory myth. Language and Dialogue 8:2  pp. 289 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda
2019. Dialogue and Artificial Intelligence. Language and Dialogue 9:2  pp. 294 ff. Crossref logo
Weigand, Edda & Istvan Kecskes
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Yus, Francisco
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Philosophy

Philosophy
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2009033353