Literary Communication as Dialogue

Responsibilities and pleasures in post-postmodern times

Selected papers 2003-2020

| Åbo Akademi University
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027207760 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-BookOrdering information
ISBN 9789027260574 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
As traced by Roger D. Sell, literary communication is a process of community-making. As long as literary authors and those responding to them respect each other’s human autonomy, literature flourishes as an enjoyable, though often challenging mode of interaction that is truly dialogical in spirit. This gives rise to author-respondent communities whose members represent existential commonalities blended together with historical differences.

These heterogeneous literary communities have a larger social significance, in that they have long served as counterweights to the hegemonic tendencies of modernity, and more recently to postmodernity’s well-intentioned but restrictive politics of identity. In post-postmodern times, their ethos is increasingly one of pleasurable egalitarianism. The despondent anti-hedonism of the twentieth century intelligentia can now seem rather dated.

Some of the papers selected for this volume develop Sell’s ideas in mainly theoretical terms. But most of them offer detailed criticism of particular anglophone writers, ranging from Shakespeare, Ben Jonson and other poets and dramatists of the early modern period, through Wordsworth and Coleridge, to Dickens, Pinter, and Rushdie.
[FILLM Studies in Languages and Literatures, 14]  Expected November 2020.  xii, 420 pp. + index
Publishing status: In production
Table of Contents
This is a provisional table of contents, and subject to changes.
Series editor’s preface
Acknowlegements
xi–xii
Introduction
2–14
Chapter 1. Postmodernity, literary pragmatics, mediating criticism: Meanings within a large circle of communicants1
16–38
Chapter 2. What is literary communication and what is a literary community?1
40–44
Chapter 3. Gadamer, Habermas, and a re-humanized literary scholarship1
46–53
Chapter 4. Sir John Beaumont and his three audiences1
56–83
Chapter 5. Dialogicality and ethics: Four cases of literary address1
86–110
Chapter 6. Encouraging the readers of tomorrow: Books and empathy1
112–115
Chapter 7. Dialogue versus silencing: Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner1
118–158
Chapter 8. Cultural memory and the communicational criticism of literature1
160–183
Chapter 9. Herbert’s considerateness: A communicational assessment1
186–191
Chapter 10. In dialogue with the ageing Wordsworth1
194–208
Chapter 11. A communicational criticism for post-postmodern times1
210–228
Chapter 12. Review1: Till Kinzel and Jarmila Mildorf (eds). Imaginary dialogues in American literature and philosophy: Beyond the mainstream2
230–235
Chapter 13. Political and hedonic re-contextualizations: Prince Charles’s Spanish journey in Beaumont, Jonson, and Middleton1
238–257
Chapter 14. Where do literary authors belong?: A post-postmodern answer1
260–275
Chapter 15. Honour dishonoured: The communicational workings of early Stuart tragedy and tragi-comedy1
278–304
Chapter 16. Dialogue and literature1
306–325
Chapter 17. Ben Jonson’s Epigram 101, “Inviting a Friend to Supper”: Literary pleasures immediately tasted1
328–358
Chapter 18. Literature, human commonalities, and cultural differences: Stability and change1
360–379
Chapter 19. Two opposed modes of communication between Dickens and his readers1
382–396
References
397–420
Index
421
References

References

Manuscripts

Bodleian Library
, MS Rawlinson B 183.
British Library
, Additional MS 33,392.
British Library
, Harleian MS 6917.
British Library
, MS Stowe 960.

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Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: DSB – Literary studies: general
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020030888