Fictive Interaction

The conversation frame in thought, language, and discourse

| University of Groningen
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027246639 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269799 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Language is intimately related to interaction. The question arises: Is the structure of interaction somehow mirrored in language structure and use? This book suggests a positive answer to this question by examining the ubiquitous phenomenon of fictive interaction, in which non-genuine conversational turns appear in discourse, even within clauses, phrases, and lexical items (e.g. “Not happy? Money back! guarantee”). The book is based on a collection of hundreds of examples of fictive interaction at all grammatical levels from a wide variety of spoken, written, and signed languages, and from many different discourse genres. Special attention is devoted to the strategic use of fictive interaction in legal argumentation, with a focus on high-profile criminal trials. Both trial lawyers and lay jurors often present material evidence or murder victims as speaking, and express emotions and intentions in conversational terms. The book thus establishes the role of the conversational turn—rather than the sentence—as the basic unit of language, and the role of conversation as a frame that structures cognition, discourse, and grammar.
[Human Cognitive Processing, 47]  2014.  xiv, 243 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Tables and figures
xi–xii
Acknowledgements
xiii–xiv
Chapter 1. Introduction: Language, interaction, and cognition
1–26
Chapter 2. Fictive interaction: The conversation frame in discourse and grammar
29–58
Chapter 3. Direct speech compounds: On the dialogue-morphology interface
59–82
Chapter 4. From talk-in-interaction to grammar: A cross-linguistic study of fictive interaction
83–112
Chapter 5. It’s like, why fictive interaction?: Multifunctional direct speech in a jury deliberation
115–140
Chapter 6. The trial as fictive trialogue: Fictive interaction imagery in legal argumentation
141–168
Chapter 7. Triadic questions in court: Searching for answers about legal “truth”
169–188
Chapter 8. Concluding remarks
189–196
References
197–218
Appendix 1: Sources for examples in Parts I and II
219–228
Appendix 2: Codes for ethnographic data in Part II
229–230
Appendix 3: Abbreviations for interlinear glosses
231–232
Author index
233–236
Language index
237–238
Subject index
239–244
“Esther Pascual’s book is one of the most significant and original contributions to language sciences in recent times. Theoretically, she achieves a profound synthesis of socio-interactional and cognitive approaches to language. Methodologically, she places comparative, crosslinguistic ethnographic analysis of conversational interaction at the heart of the linguistic enterprise. Not only linguists, but psychologists in the dialogical and dialectical tradition stretching back to Bakhtin, Vološinov and Vygotsky, will find rich material and brilliant insights in what is sure to become a classic work.”
“People talk with each other—that’s what language is for. In this fascinating and deeply researched book Esther Pascual shows that the structures of conversational interaction leave their traces all through the grammars and lexicons of languages. We talk not only to exchange information, but also to create fictive situations in which talk is used to subtly convey intentions, evaluations, and more. Pascual explores linguistic structures of fictive interaction across a wide range of languages and contexts, all the way from the language of everyday life to murder trials, and comparing oral and written languages. In the process she proposes bold hypotheses and lays the groundwork for a linguistics based on the conversational mind, replacing the “sentence” with the “conversational turn.” A rich and important book.”
“There's nothing fictive about Fictive Interaction. The book is factual and logical. It walks the reader down a path of well-reasoned explanations for how language works, across a wide range of interactive domains, including legal argumentation. Innovative and insightful!”
“This book, with its well-structured organization, approachable writing style, well-founded argumentation and profound implications, is a particularly timely contribution to Cognitive Linguistics research. Its most outstanding contribution is that it opens up a whole new research line.”
“In this incisive and highly readable study, Pascual makes a cogent and thorough case for the central status of the conversation frame in human understanding. She explores not only "the conversational turn" as the basic unit of language, but also the ways in which imaginative mental webs can create new, emergent meaning—fictive interactions, especially fictive conversations. She shows how fictive conversations populate our lives.”
“In sum, Fictive Interaction is a “must-read book.” FI can no longer be written off as a dialectal or marginal phenomenon but rather must be included and integrated in theories of syntax, semantics, and other areas of linguistic inquiry.”
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Birchall, Joshua
2018. Historical change in reported speech constructions in the Chapacuran family. Journal of Historical Linguistics 8:1  pp. 7 ff. Crossref logo
Brandt, Line & Esther Pascual
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 303 ff. Crossref logo
Chaemsaithong, Krisda
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 113 ff. Crossref logo
Demeter, Gusztav
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 151 ff. Crossref logo
Dornelas, Aline & Esther Pascual
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 343 ff. Crossref logo
FitzGerald, William & Todd Oakley
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 131 ff. Crossref logo
Gentens, Caroline, María Sol Sansiñena, Stef Spronck & An Van linden
2019. Irregular perspective shifts and perspective persistence, discourse-oriented and theoretical approaches. Pragmatics 29:2  pp. 155 ff. Crossref logo
Igl, Natalia
2019.  In Experiencing Fictional Worlds [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 32],  pp. 97 ff. Crossref logo
Jarque Moyano, Maria Josep
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 171 ff. Crossref logo
Królak, Emilia
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 235 ff. Crossref logo
Leuschner, Torsten
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 193 ff. Crossref logo
Lou, Adrian
2017. Multimodal simile. English Text Construction 10:1  pp. 106 ff. Crossref logo
Matos Rocha, Luiz Fernando & Pablo Arantes
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 215 ff. Crossref logo
Mustajoki, Arto, Tatiana Sherstinova & Ulla Tuomarla
2018.  In From Pragmatics to Dialogue [Dialogue Studies, 31],  pp. 189 ff. Crossref logo
Pagán Cánovas, Cristóbal & Mark Turner
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 45 ff. Crossref logo
Pascual, Esther, Aline Dornelas & Todd Oakley
2017. When “Goal!” means ‘soccer’. Pragmatics & Cognition 24:3  pp. 315 ff. Crossref logo
Pascual, Esther & Emilia Królak
2018. The ‘listen to characters thinking’ novel. Review of Cognitive Linguistics 16:2  pp. 399 ff. Crossref logo
Pascual, Esther & Sergeiy Sandler
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 3 ff. Crossref logo
QIU, SIQI & YIRUI LIANG
2018. Esther Pascual and Sergeiy Sandler (Eds.), The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2016. Pp. 384. ISBN 978-90-272-4671-4 (Hb), 978-90-272-6650-7 (E-book). Language and Cognition 10:3  pp. 544 ff. Crossref logo
Sandler, Sergeiy
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 23 ff. Crossref logo
Sandler, Sergeiy & Esther Pascual
2019. In the beginning there was conversation. Pragmatics 29:2  pp. 250 ff. Crossref logo
Spronck, Stef
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 255 ff. Crossref logo
Sullivan, Karen
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 87 ff. Crossref logo
van der Voort, Hein
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 277 ff. Crossref logo
Vandelanotte, Lieven
2017.  Isabelle Buchstaller , Quotatives: New trends and sociolinguistic implications. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. Pp. xviii +306. ISBN 9780470657188.. English Language and Linguistics 21:1  pp. 184 ff. Crossref logo
Vandelanotte, Lieven
2019. Changing perspectives. Pragmatics 29:2  pp. 170 ff. Crossref logo
Versluis, Christine & Lou-Ann Kleppa
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 323 ff. Crossref logo
Xiang, Mingjian
2016.  In The Conversation Frame [Human Cognitive Processing, 55],  pp. 63 ff. Crossref logo
Xiang, Mingjian & Esther Pascual
2016. Debate with zhuangzi. Pragmatics 26:1  pp. 137 ff. Crossref logo
Zhao, Yushan
2018. Review of Pascual, E. & S. Sandler, Eds. (2016) The conversation frame: Forms and functions of fictive interaction . Review of Cognitive Linguistics 16:2  pp. 537 ff. Crossref logo
ZIMA, ELISABETH & GEERT BRÔNE
2015. Cognitive Linguistics and interactional discourse: time to enter into dialogue. Language and Cognition 7:4  pp. 485 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 17 october 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014017624