Chapter published in:
Motion and Space across Languages: Theory and applications
Edited by Iraide Ibarretxe-Antuñano
[Human Cognitive Processing 59] 2017
► pp. 6194
References

References

Allen, S., Özyürek, A., Kita, S., Brown, A., Furman, R., & Ishizuka, T.
2007Language-specific and universal influences in children's syntactic packaging of Manner and Path: A comparison of English, Japanese, and Turkish. Cognition, 102(1), 16–48. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Aske, J.
1989Path predicates in English and Spanish: A closer look. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, 15, 1–14. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G.
1974Working memory. In G. H. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation: Advances in research and theory. Vol. 8 (47–89). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Blomberg, J., & Zlatev, J.
2009Linguistic relativity, mediation and the categorization of motion. In J. Zlatev, M. Andrén, M. Johansson Falck, & C. Lundmark (Eds.), Studies in language and cognition (46–61). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
Bohnemeyer, J., Eisenbeiss, S., & Narasimhan, B.
2001Event triads. In S. C. Levinson, & N. J. Enfield (Eds.), ‘Manual’ for the field season 2001 (100–114). Nijmegen: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.Google Scholar
Bowerman, M., & Choi, S.
2003Space under construction: Language-specific categorization in first language acquisition. In D. Gentner, & S. Goldin-Meadow (Eds.), Language in mind: Advances in the study of language and thought (387–427). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Cadierno, T.
2004Expressing motion events in a second language: A cognitive typological perspective. In M. Achard, & S. Niemeyer (Eds.), Cognitive linguistics, second language acquisition, and foreign language teaching (13–49). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008Learning to talk about motion in a foreign language. In P. Robinson, & N. C. Ellis (Eds.), Handbook of cognitive linguistics and second language acquisition (239–274). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Cadierno, T., & Lund, K.
2004Cognitive linguistics and second language acquisition: Motion events in a typological framework. In B. VanPatten, J. Williams, S. Rott, & M. Overstreet (Eds.), Form-meaning connections in second language acquisition (139–154). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Carroll, M., Lambert, M., Weimar, K., Flecken, M., & von Stutterheim, C.
2012Tracing trajectories: Motion event construal by advanced L2 French-English and L2 French-German speakers. Language, Interaction and Acquisition (LIA), 3(2), 202–230. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Choi, S.
2011Language-specificity of motion event expressions in young Korean children. Language, Interaction and Acquisition (LIA), 2(1), 157–184. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Choi, S., & Bowerman, M.
1991Learning to express motion events in English and Korean: The influence of language-specific lexicalization patterns. Cognition, 41(1–3), 83–121. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Choi, S., & Hattrup, K.
2012Relative contribution of cognition/perception and language on spatial categorization. Cognitive Science, 36, 102–129. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Engemann, H.
2012Motion event expression in bilingual first language acquisition. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge.Google Scholar
Engemann, H., Hendriks, H., Hickmann, M., Soroli, E., & Vincent, C.
2015How language impacts memory of motion events in English and French. Cognitive Processing – International Quarterly of Cognitive Science 16(supplement 1), 209–213. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Evans, N., & Levinson, S. C.
2009The myth of language universals: Language diversity and its importance for cognitive science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32(5), 429–448. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Filipović, L.
2011Speaking and remembering in one or two languages: Bilingual vs. monolingual lexicalization in memory for motion events. International Journal of Bilingualism, 15(4), 466–485. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gennari, S. P., Sloman, S. A., Malt, B. C., & Fitch, W. T.
2002Motion events in language and cognition. Cognition, 83, 49–79. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gumperz, J. J., & Levinson, S. C.
1996Rethinking linguistic relativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Harr, A.-K.
2012The impact of language-specific factors in first language acquisition: The expression of motion in French and German. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hendriks, H., & Hickmann, M.
2011Expressing voluntary motion in a second language: English learners of French. In V. Cook, & B. Bassetti (Eds.), Language and bilingual cognition (315–339). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Hendriks, H., Hickmann, M., & Demagny, A.-C.
2008How English native speakers learn to express caused motion in English and French. Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère, 27, 15–41.Google Scholar
Hermer-Vazquez, L., Spelke, E. S., & Katsnelson, A. S.
1999Sources of flexibility in human cognition: Dual task studies of space and language. Cognitive Psychology, 39, 3–36. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hickmann, M.
2010Linguistic relativity in first language acquisition: Spatial language and cognition. In M. Kail, & M. Hickmann (Eds.), Language acquisition across linguistic and cognitive systems (125–146). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hickmann, M., & Robert, S.
2006Space in languages: Linguistic systems and cognitive categories. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hickmann, M., Hendriks, H., & Champaud, C.
2009aTypological constraints on motion in French and English child language. In J. Guo, E. Lieven, S. Ervin-Tripp, N. Budwig, K. Nakamura, & Ş. Özçalışkan (Eds.), Crosslinguistic approaches to the psychology of language: Research in the tradition of Dan Isaac Slobin (209–224). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Hickmann, M., Taranne, P., & Bonnet, P.
2009bMotion in first language acquisition: Manner and Path in French and English child language. Journal of Child Language, 36(4), 705–741. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hickmann, M., Soroli, E., Engemann, H., Hendriks, H., & Vincent, C.
2014Typological factors in the development of verbal and non-verbal spatial cognition: A comparison of French and English. Paper presented at the 5th International Conference in Cognitive Linguistics, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK, 29–31 July 2014.
Ibarretxe-Antuñano, I.
2009Path salience in motion events. In J. Guo, E. Lieven, N. Budwig, S. Ervin-Tripp, K. Nakamura, & S. Özçalışkan (Eds.), Crosslinguistic approaches to the psychology of language: Research in the tradition of Dan Isaac Slobin (403–414). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Ji, Y.
2009The expression of voluntary and caused motion events in Chinese and in English: Typological and developmental perspectives. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge.Google Scholar
Ji, Y., Hendriks, H., & Hickmann, M.
2011aThe expression of caused motion events in Chinese and in English: Some typological issues. Linguistics, 49(5), 1041–1076. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011bChildren’s expression of voluntary motion events in English and Chinese. Journal of Foreign Languages, 34(4), 2–20.Google Scholar
Lavie, N., Hirst, A., De Fockert, J., & Viding, E.
2004Load theory of selective attention and cognitive control. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 133(3), 339–354. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Levinson, S. C.
2003Space in language and cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Levinson, S. C., & Wilkins, D.
2006Grammars of space: Explorations in cognitive diversity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lucy, J. A.
1992Language diversity and thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Majid, A., Bowerman, M., Kita, S., Haun, D. B., & Levinson, S. C.
2004Can language restructure cognition? The case for space. Trends in Cognitive Science, 8, 108–114. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Newton, A. M., & De Villiers, J. G.
2007Thinking while talking: Adults fail nonverbal false-belief reasoning. Psychological Science, 18, 574–579. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Özçalışkan, Ş.
2009Learning to talk about spatial motion in language-specific ways. In J. Guo, E. Lieven, S. Ervin-Tripp, N. Budwig, K. Nakamura, & Ş. Özçalışkan (Eds.), Crosslinguistic approaches to the psychology of language: Research in the tradition of Dan Isaac Slobin (263–276). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
2015Ways of crossing a spatial boundary in typologically distinct languages. Applied Psycholinguistics, 36(2), 485–508. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Papafragou, A., Hulbert, J., & Trueswell, J.
2008Does language guide event perception? Evidence from eye movements. Cognition, 108, 155–184. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Papafragou, A., Massey, C., & Gleitman, L.
2002Shake, rattle, ’n’ roll: The representation of motion in language and cognition. Cognition, 84, 189–219. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Papafragou, A., & Selimis, S.
2010Event categorisation and language: A cross-linguistic study of motion. Language and Cognitive Processes, 25, 224–260. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pourcel, S.
2005Relativism in the linguistic representation and cognitive conceptualization of motion events across verb-framed and satellite-framed languages. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Durham.Google Scholar
Schneider, W., Eschman, A., & Zuccolotto, A.
2002E-Prime reference guide. Pittsburgh, PA: Psychology Software Tools Inc.Google Scholar
Slobin, D. I.
1996From “thought and language” to “thinking for speaking”. In J. J. Gumperz, & S. C. Levinson (Eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (70–96). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
2004How people move: Discourse effects of linguistic typology. In C. L. Moder, & A. Martinovic-Zić (Eds.), Discourse across languages and cultures (195–210). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2006What makes manner of motion salient? Explorations in linguistic typology, discourse, and cognition. In M. Hickmann, & S. Robert (Eds.), Space across languages: Linguistic systems and cognitive categories (59–81). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Slobin, D. I., Ibarretxe-Antuñano, I., Kopecka, A., & Majid, A.
2014Manners of human gait: A crosslinguistic event-naming study. Cognitive Linguistics, 25, 701–741. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Soroli, E.
2011Language and spatial cognition in French and in English: Crosslinguistic perspectives in aphasia. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Paris 8.Google Scholar
2012Variation in spatial language and cognition: Exploring visuo-spatial thinking and speaking cross-linguistically. Cognitive Processing – International Quarterly of Cognitive Science, 13(1), 333–337. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Soroli, E., & Hickmann, M.
2010Language and spatial representations in French and in English: Evidence from eye-movements. In G. Marotta, A. Lenci, L. Meini, & F. Rovai (Eds.), Space in language (581–597). Pisa: ETS.Google Scholar
Soroli, E., Hickmann, M., Hendriks, H., Engemann, H., & Vincent, C.
2015Language effects on spatial cognition? Cross-linguistic evidence and eye-tracking. Paper presented at NINJAL International Symposium: Typology and Cognition in Motion Event Descriptions. Tokyo, Japan, 24–25 January 2015.
Talmy, L.
2000Toward a cognitive semantics. Vol. II: Typology and process in concept structuring. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
von Stutterheim, C., & Nüse, R.
2003Processes of conceptualisation in language production: Language specific perspectives and event construal. Linguistics, 41, 851–881.Google Scholar
Zhou, X., Chen, C., Zhang, H., Xue, G., & Dong, Q.
2006Neural substrates for forward and backward recitation of numbers and the alphabet: A close examination of the role of intraparietal sulcus and perisylvian areas. Brain Research, 1099(1), 109–120. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zlatev, J., Blomberg, J., & David, C.
2010Translocation: Language and the categorization of experience. In V. Evans (Ed.), Language, cognition, and space: The state of the art and new directions (389–418). Sheffield, UK: Equinox.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Cappelle, Bert
2020.  In Broader Perspectives on Motion Event Descriptions [Human Cognitive Processing, 69],  pp. 235 ff. Crossref logo
HICKMANN, Maya, Henriëtte HENDRIKS, Anne-Katharina HARR & Philippe BONNET
2018. Caused motion across child languages: a comparison of English, German, and French. Journal of Child Language 45:6  pp. 1247 ff. Crossref logo
Soroli, Efstathia, Maya Hickmann & Henriëtte Hendriks
2019.  In The Semantics of Dynamic Space in French [Human Cognitive Processing, 66],  pp. 250 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 30 december 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.