Article published in:
Gender Across Languages: Volume 4
Edited by Marlis Hellinger and Heiko Motschenbacher
[IMPACT: Studies in Language, Culture and Society 36] 2015
► pp. 277301
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2021.  In A History of the Study of the Indigenous Languages of North America [Studies in the History of the Language Sciences, 129], Crossref logo

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References

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