Article published in:
Dialogues in Diachrony: Celebrating Historical Corpora of Speech-related Texts
Edited by Merja Kytö and Terry Walker
[Journal of Historical Pragmatics 19:2] 2018
► pp. 167185
Sources

Sources

Corpus of Historical Textbooks (HIST)

Austin, Ruth
1913Lessons in English for Foreign Women: For Use in Settlements and Evening Schools. New York, Cincinnati, Chicago: American Book Company.Google Scholar
Berlitz, Maximilian Delphinus
1917Method for Teaching Foreign Languages. New York: M. D. Berlitz.Google Scholar
Darling, Alice I.
1914Foreigners’ Guide to English. Yonkers-on-Hudson, New York: World Book Company.Google Scholar
Houghton, Frederick
1911First Lessons in English for Foreigners in Evening Schools. New York, Cincinnati, Chicago: American Book Company.Google Scholar
Jimperieff, Mary
1915Progressive Lessons in English for Foreigners: First Year. Boston: Ginn and Company.Google Scholar
O’Brien, Sara Redempta
1909English for Foreigners. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.Google Scholar
Tenney, C. D.
1905English Lessons. London: Macmillan and Co. Limited.Google Scholar
Thorley, Wilfrid Charles
1916A Primer of English for Foreign Students. London: Macmillan and Co. Limited.Google Scholar
Wallach, Isabel Richman
1906A First Book in English for Foreigners. New York, Boston, Chicago: Silver, Burdett and Company.Google Scholar
[ p. 184 ]

Corpus of Self-Study Texts (SEST)

King, Gareth
2004Colloquial English: A Course for Non-Native Speakers. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Living Language
2009English: Essential Course. New York: Living Language.Google Scholar
Pelteret, Cheryl
2012Speaking: B1+ [Collins English for Life: Skills]. London: Collins.Google Scholar
Stevens, Sandra
2014Complete English as a Foreign Language. London: Hodder and Stoughton.Google Scholar
Woodford, Kate and Elizabeth Walter
2011Easy Learning English Conversation. London: Collins.Google Scholar

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