Guidelines

1. Manuscripts should be submitted through the journal’s online submission and manuscript tracking site.

2. Submissions should be accompanied by a biographical note (50-75 words), an abstract (100-150 words) and (up to about six) keywords.

3. Manuscripts should be submitted as email attachments. If they contain unusual fonts, a pdf version should also be included. Manuscripts should be anonymized (self-references omitted and files stripped of personal metadata).

4. Papers should be reasonably divided into sections and, if necessary, sub-sections. In general papers should be from 8,000 to 10,000 words in length (including references).

5. Contributions should be in English. Spelling should be either British or American English consistently throughout. If not written by a native speaker of English it is advisable to have the paper checked by a native speaker.

6. Line drawings (figures) and photographs (plates) should be submitted in TIFF, EPS or PDF format.

7. Tables should be numbered consecutively and provided with appropriate captions. They should be referred to in the main text. When there are multiple tables, they can be submitted in a separate file, or at the end of the paper, and their desired position in the paper indicated.

8. Quotations should be given in double quotation marks. Quotations longer than four lines should be indented with extra space above and below the quoted text.

9. Examples (illustrations) should be numbered with Arabic numerals in parentheses and set apart from the main body of the text with space above and below. Examples from languages other than Modern English should be provided with a translation in single quotes immediately below each such example. If necessary, a word-by-word gloss (without quotes) may be provided between the example phrase and the translation. Consult the Leipzig Glossing Rules for guidelines: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/resources/glossing-rules.php

10. Notes should be kept to a minimum. They should be numbered consecutively throughout the text in superscript. The notes should not contain reference material if this can be absorbed in the text and list of references. Nor should they contain acknowledgements, which, if used, are given a separate heading and placed immediately before the notes.

11. References:

Once your paper is accepted for publication, it is essential that the references be formatted to the specifications given in these guidelines, as these cannot be formatted automatically. This book series uses the ‘Author-Date’ style as described in the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS).
References in the text: These should be as precise as possible, giving page references where necessary; for example (Clahsen 1991: 252) or: as in Brown et al. (1991: 252). Multiple references should be listed in chronological order. All references in the text should appear in the references section.
References section: References should be listed first alphabetically and then chronologically. The section should include all (and only!) references that are actually mentioned in the text.
A note on capitalization in titles. For titles in English, CMS uses headline-style capitalization. In titles and subtitles, capitalize the first and last words, and all other major words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, some conjunctions). Do not capitalize articles; prepositions (unless used adverbially or adjectivally, or as part of a Latin expression used adverbially or adjectivally); the conjunctions and, but, for, or, nor; to as part of an infinitive; as in any grammatical function; parts of proper names that would be lower case in normal text; the second part of a species name. For more details and examples, consult the Chicago Manual of Style. For any other languages, and English translations of titles given in square brackets, CMS uses sentence-style capitalization: capitalization as in normal prose, i.e., the first word in the title, the subtitle, and any proper names or other words normally given initial capitals in the language in question.

Examples

Book:

Görlach, Manfred. 2003. English Words Abroad. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Spear, Norman E., and Ralph R. Miller (eds). 1981. Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in book):

Adams, Clare A., and Anthony Dickinson. 1981. “Actions and Habits: Variation in Associative Representation during Instrumental Learning.” In Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms, ed. by Norman E. Spear, and Ralph R. Miller, 143–186. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in journal):

Claes, Jeroen, and Luis A. Ortiz López. 2011. “Restricciones pragmáticas y sociales en la expresión de futuridad en el español de Puerto Rico [Pragmatic and social restrictions in the expression of the future in Puerto Rican Spanish].” Spanish in Context 8: 50–72.

Rayson, Paul, Geoffrey N. Leech, and Mary Hodges. 1997. “Social Differentiation in the Use of English Vocabulary: Some Analyses of the Conversational Component of the British National Corpus.” International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 2 (1): 120–132.

12. The first author of a contribution will receive a PDF of first proofs of the article for correction via email and will be requested to return the corrections on a hard copy to the journal editor within ten days of receipt. Acrobat Reader can be downloaded for free from www.adobe.com which will enable you to read and print the file. Please limit corrections to the essential. It is at the publisher’s discretion not to implement substantial textual changes or to charge the author. If it is absolutely necessary to change larger chunks of text (i.e. more than just a few words), it is best to submit the changes on disk (with identical hard copy).

13. Editorial correspondence should be sent to the Editor:

Prof. Dawn Archer
School of Language, Literature and International Studies
University of Central Lancashire
Preston, PR1 2HE
UK
d.archer at mmu.ac.uk

Please contact the journal editor if you cannot handle proofs for your article in electronic format (i.e., receive the proofs as a PDF-attachment at your email address).