Article published in:
Journal of Language and Politics
Vol. 4:2 (2005) ► pp. 331365
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Thurston, Thomas
2006. SLAVERY: ANNUAL BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SUPPLEMENT (2005). Slavery & Abolition 27:3  pp. 415 ff. Crossref logo

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