Article published in:
Journal of Language and Politics
Vol. 6:3 (2007) ► pp. 303325
Cited by

Cited by 5 other publications

No author info given
2015.  In Israeli Peace Discourse [Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture, 59], Crossref logo
Bates, Benjamin R.
2015. Mapping US Humanitarian Aid: A Pentadic Cartography of Michael Leavitt'sHealth Diplomacy. Communication Studies 66:2  pp. 125 ff. Crossref logo
Belova, Oksana
2016. The challenge of reset . Journal of Language and Politics 15:6  pp. 748 ff. Crossref logo
Darr, Christopher R. & Harry C. Strine IV
2017. Natural Disasters and the Rhetorical Construction of American Values: Community Exceptionalism as Representative Anecdote. Atlantic Journal of Communication 25:5  pp. 293 ff. Crossref logo
Swain, Elizabeth
2017.  In Argumentation across Communities of Practice [Argumentation in Context, 10],  pp. 127 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 12 april 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

References

References

Albright, Madeline R.
2003Madam Secretary. New York: Miramax Books.Google Scholar
Apple, R.W. Jr.
1998, March 24. Into Africa. The New York Times, A10.Google Scholar
Aune, James Arnt
1994Rhetoric and Marxism. Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Baritz, Loren.
1985Backfire: A History of How American Culture Led Us Into Vietnam and Made Us Fight the Way We Did. New York: William Morrow.Google Scholar
Brinkley, Douglas.
1997Democratic enlargement. Foreign Policy 108, 118–128.Google Scholar
Brummett, Barry.
1984aBurke’s representative anecdote as a method in media criticism. Critical Studies in Mass Communication 1, 161–76. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1984bThe representative anecdote as a Burkean method, applied to Evangelical rhetoric. The Southern Speech Communication Journal 50, 1–23. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Burke, Kenneth.
1945A Rhetoric of Motives. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
1937Attitudes Toward History. New York: The New Republic Press.Google Scholar
Butler, John R.
2002Somalia and the imperial savage: Continuities in the rhetoric of war. Western Journal of Communication 66, 1–24. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Clinton, Bill.
2004My Life. New York: Alfred Knopf.Google Scholar
Clinton, William Jefferson
2000a, September 6. Remarks to the United Nations millennium summit in New York City. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 2 Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 1758–1759.Google Scholar
2000b, September 18. President Clinton’s final address to the United Nations Security Council. www​.globalhealth​.org​/news​/article​/590 Accessed April 24, 2004.Google Scholar
1999a, February 26. Remarks on United States Foreign Policy in San Francisco. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 271–279.Google Scholar
1999b/2000, March 24. America’s war on Serbia (Yugoslavia). In: Alvin Z. Rubinstein, Albina Shayevich and Boris Zlotnikov (eds) 1999b/2000 The Clinton foreign policy reader: Presidential speeches and commentary. New York: M.E. Sharpe, 193–200.Google Scholar
1998a, March 23. Remarks to the people of Ghana in Accra. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1 Washington, D.C.: he United States Government Printing Office, 419–421.Google Scholar
1998b, March 24. Remarks at the Kisowera school in Mukono, Uganda. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 426–428.Google Scholar
1998c, March 25. Remarks to genocide survivors in Kigali, Rwanda. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C: The United States Government Printing Office, 431–434.Google Scholar
1998d, March 25. Remarks at the Entebbe Summit for Peace and Prosperity. The Public Papers of the President, Vol.1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 438–439.Google Scholar
1998e, March 26. Address to the parliament of South Africa in Cape Town. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington, D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 442–444.Google Scholar
1998f, March 26. Remarks at the opening of the Ronald H. Brown Commercial Center in Johannesburg, South Africa. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 446–449.Google Scholar
1998g, March 31. Remarks to African environmentalists in Gaborne, Botswana. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 476–479.Google Scholar
1998h, April 2. Remarks at Goree Island, Senegal. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 494–496.Google Scholar
1997, January 20. Inaugural address. The Public Papers of the President, Vol.1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 43–46.Google Scholar
1995, March 1. Remarks to the Nixon Center Peace and Freedom Policy Conference. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 283–289.Google Scholar
1994, November 10. Remarks to the Edmund Wash School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 2 Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 2052–2060.Google Scholar
1993a, February 26. Liberal internationalism: American and the global economy, speech at American University. In: Alvin Z. Rubinstein, Albina Shayevich, and Boris Zlotnikov (eds) 1993a The Clinton Foreign Policy Reader: Presidential Speeches with Commentary. New York: M.E. Sharpe, 8–13.Google Scholar
1993b, September 27. Remarks to the 48th session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. The Public Papers of the President, Vol. 2. Washington D.C.: The United States Government Printing Office, 1612–1618.Google Scholar
Clinton foreign policy
Clintons are heading for historic six-nation tour of Africa
1998, March 21. St. Louis Post-Dis-patch, 23.Google Scholar
Cole, Timothy M.
1996When intentions go awry: The Bush administrations foreign policy rhetoric. Political Communication 13, 93–113. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Coles, Roberta L.
2002Manifest destiny adapted for 1990s’ war discourse: Mission and destiny intertwined. Sociology of Religion 63, 403–426. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cox, Michael.
2000Wilsonianism resurgent? The Clinton administration and the promotion of democracy. In: Michael Cox, G. John Ikenberrry and Takeshi Inoguchi (eds) 2000 American Democracy Promotion Oxford: Oxford University Press, 218–239. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Doyle, Michael.
2000Peace, liberty, and democracy: Realists and liberalists contest a legacy. In: Michael Cox, G. John Ikenberry and Takeshi Inoguchi (eds) 2000 American Democracy Promotion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 18–35. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1983Kant, liberal legacies and foreign affairs. Philosophy and Public Affairs, 12, 205–235.Google Scholar
Edwards, Jason A.
2006Foreign Policy Rhetoric for the Post-Cold War World: Bill Clinton and America’s Foreign Policy Vocabulary. Unpublished dissertation. Atlanta: Georgia State University.Google Scholar
Fisher, Walter R.
1994Narration as a human communication paradigm: The case of public moral argument. Communication Monographs, 54, 1–22.Google Scholar
Fukuyama, Francis.
1992The End of History and the Last Man. New York: Avon.Google Scholar
Gilpin, Robert.
1981War and Change in World Politics. New York: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hunt, Tom.
1998, March 22. Clinton’s Africa trip reflects U.S. ambitions. Chicago Sun-Times, 35.Google Scholar
Ikenberry, G. John
2001After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order After Major Wars. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
1999Why export democracy?: The ‘hidden grand strategy’ of American foreign policy. The Wilson Quarterly 23, 58–68.Google Scholar
Ivie, Robert L.
2000A new democratic world order? In: Martin Medhurst & H.W. Brands (eds) 2000 Critical Reflections on the Cold War: Linking Rhetoric and History. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 247–265.Google Scholar
1980Images of savagery in American justifications for war. Communication Monographs 47, 279–294. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ivie, R.L..
1974Presidential motives for war. Quarterly Journal of Speech 51, 337–345. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Joseph, Roy.
2006The New World Order: President Bush and the Post-Cold War Era. In Martin J. Medhurst (Ed.) 2006 The Rhetorical Presidency of George H.W. Bush College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 81–101.Google Scholar
Kane, Thomas.
1991Foreign policy suppositions and commanding ideas. Argumentation and Advocacy 28, 80–90.Google Scholar
Lynch, Christopher.
1999, December 173. Genocide panel faults U.N. for Rwanda tragedy; Paralysis of major powers also blamed. The Washington Post, A29.Google Scholar
McCormick, James M.
2002Foreign policy legacies of the Clinton administration for American administration in the twenty-first century. In: Robert Rabel (Ed.) 2002 The American Century? In Retrospect and Prospect. Westport: Praeger, 85–108.Google Scholar
McDougall, Walter A.
1997Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776. New York: Houghton Milton.Google Scholar
McEvoy-Levy, Siobahn
2001American Exceptionalism and US Foreign Policy: Public Diplomacy at the End of the Cold War. New York: Palgrave. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
McIntyre, Alistair.
1981After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
Madsen, Andrew.
1993Burke’s representative anecdote as critical method. In: James W. Chesebro(Ed.). Extensions of the Burkean System. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 208–229.Google Scholar
Melvern, Linda R.
2000A People Betrayed: The Role of the West in Rwanda’s Genocide. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
Meisler, Steven.
1994, May 26. Rwanda ‘genocide’ angers, frustrates U.N. chief. The Los Angeles Times, A6.Google Scholar
Morrow, Lance.
1998, October 12. Rwandan tragedy, Lewinsky farce. Time, 126.Google Scholar
Nye, Joseph S.., Jr
2003The power of persuasion: Dual components of U.S. leadership. Harvard International Review, 46–49.Google Scholar
2002The Paradox of American Power. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
1993Understanding International Conflict: An Introduction to Theory and History. New York: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Paulson, John.
2002Theodore Roosevelt and the rhetoric of citizenship: On tour in New England, 1902. Communication Quarterly 50, 123–134. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Rockman, Bert A.
1997The presidency and bureaucratic change after the Cold War. In: Robert B. Ripley and James M. Lindsey (eds). United States Foreign Policy After the Cold War. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 41–60.Google Scholar
Rose, Robert.
1991The Postmodern President: George Bush Meets the World, 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Ross, Sheila.
1998, March 23. Ghana welcomes Clinton, President starts historic tour of African nation. Chicago Sun-Times, 1.Google Scholar
Rubinstein, Alvin Z., Shayevich, Albina and Zlotnikov, Boris
2000The Clinton Foreign Policy Reader: Presidential Speeches with Commentary. New York: M.E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
Schonberg, Karl K.
2003Pursuing the National Interest: Moments of Transition in Twentieth Century American Foreign Policy. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.Google Scholar
Smith, Larry D.
1987The nominating convention as purveyor of political medicine: An anecdotal analysis of the Democrats and Republicans of 1984. Central States Speech Journal 38, 252–261. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Larry D. and Golden, Jerry L.
1988Electronic storytelling in electoral politics: An anecdotal analysis of television advertising in the Helms-Hunt Senate race. The Southern Speech Communication Journal 53, 244–258. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Tony.
1995The United States and the Worldwide Struggle for Democracy in the Twentieth Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Smyth, Frank.
1999, May 20. The genocide doctrine. www​.franksmyth​.com. Accessed March 20, 2006.Google Scholar
Soderberg, Nancy.
2005The Superpower Myth: The Use and Misuse of American Might. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Stuckey, Mary E.
1995Competing foreign policy visions: Rhetorical hybrids after the Cold War. Western Journal of Communication 59, 214–227. CrossrefGoogle Scholar