Time and Again

Theoretical perspectives on formal linguistics

In honor of D. Terence Langendoen

Editors
| Microsoft Research
| University of Arizona
| University of Arizona
| University of Washington
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027255181 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027289629 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
This volume is a collection of papers that highlights some recurring themes that have surfaced in the generative tradition in linguistics over the past 40 years. The volume is more than a historical take on a theoretical tradition; rather, it is also a "compass" pointing to exciting new empirical directions inspired by generative theory. In fact, the papers show a progression from core theoretical concerns to data-driven experimental investigation and can be divided roughly into two categories: those that follow a syntactic and theoretical course, and those that follow an experimental or applied path. Many of the papers revisit long-standing or recurring themes in the generative tradition, some of which seek experimental validation or refutation. The merger of theoretical and experimental concerns makes this volume stand out, but it is also forward looking in that it addresses the recent concerns of the creation and consumption of data across the discipline.
[Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 135]  2009.  xiv, 265 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii
Introduction
William D. Lewis, Simin Karimi, Scott O. Farrar and Heidi Harley
ix–xiv
Part I. Syntax and semantics
1. Inverse reflexives
Paul M. Postal and John Robert Ross
3–36
2. On the nature of the approximative expression NUM-odd
Sheila Ann Dooley and Ferdinand de Haan
37–53
3. Skating along the syntactic verge: Experimental pragmatics and understood elements of content
Merrill Garrett and Robert M. Harnish
55–89
4. Current challenges to the Lexicalist Hypothesis: An overview and a critique
Frederick J. Newmeyer
91–117
Part II. Psycholinguistics
5. On the homogeneity of syntax: How similar do coordinates and subordinates look to the comprehension system?
Wayne Cowart and Tatiana Agupova
121–134
6. The effect of case marking on subject-verb agreement errors in English
Janet L. Nicol and Ines Antón-Méndez
135–150
7. First language acquisition of coordination: The mud-puddle study and beyond
Barbara Lust, Suzanne Flynn, Yuchin Chien and Barbara Krawiec
151–175
8. Frequency effects in children's syntactic and morphological development
Cecile McKee and Dana McDaniel
177–187
9. Abstract linguistic representations and innateness: The development of determiners
Virginia Valian
189–206
Part III. Language as a Formal System
10. One-level finite-state phonology
Michael Hammond
209–225
11. Biolinguistics today and Platonism yesterday
Thomas G. Bever
227–232
Part IV. Standards
12. Linguistics as a community activity: The paradox of freedom through standards
Gary F. Simons
235–250
13. Sherwin Cody's school of English
Edwin Battistella
251–261
Index
263–265
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Alexiadou, Artemis
2019. Rochelle Lieber, English nouns: The ecology of nominalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. ix + 197. ISBN 9781107161375.. English Language and Linguistics 23:03  pp. 735 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 27 september 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2008035987 | Marc record