Cognitive Grammar in Contemporary Fiction

| Coventry University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027234155 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027265562 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
This book proposes an extension of Cognitive Grammar (Langacker 1987, 1991, 2008) towards a cognitive discourse grammar, through the unique environment that literary stylistic application offers. Drawing upon contemporary research in cognitive stylistics (Text World Theory, deixis and mind-modelling, amongst others), the volume scales up central Cognitive Grammar concepts (such as construal, grounding, the reference point model and action chains) in order to explore the attenuation of experience – and how it is simulated – in literary reading. In particular, it considers a range of contemporary texts by Neil Gaiman, Jennifer Egan, Jonathan Safran Foer, Ian McEwan and Paul Auster. This application builds upon previous work that adopts Cognitive Grammar for literary analysis and provides the first extended account of Cognitive Grammar in contemporary fiction.
[Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 26]  2017.  ix, 164 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix
Chapter 1. Introduction
2–10
Chapter 2. Cognitive Grammar: An overview
11–30
Chapter 3. Action chains and grounding inEnduring Love
31–48
Chapter 4. The reference point model: Tracking character roles inThe New York Trilogy
49–69
Chapter 5. Interrelated references and fictional world elaboration inCoraline
71–89
Chapter 6. Mind-modelling perspective in ‘Great Rock and Roll Pauses’
91–111
Chapter 7. Scanning the compositional path of ‘Here We Aren’t, So Quickly’
113–129
Chapter 8. Conclusion
131–136
References
137–150
Index
163–164
Appendix
151–162
“This is an ambitious and immensely insightful book that pushes the boundaries of what modern stylistics can achieve. Harrison takes Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar and explores its analytical power by convincingly accounting for both the style of contemporary literary fiction and the responses of different readers. Outlining and drawing on a number of Cognitive Grammar concepts, Harrison provides exemplary discussions of a range of texts, which demonstrate that the framework has the potential to be an important and enabling method in the stylistician’s ‘tool-kit’.”
“This pioneering book offers startling new insights into the experience of reading, applying cutting-edge linguistic theory to innovative, contemporary literature. It makes a brilliant and convincing case for the explanatory power of cognitive grammar, establishing its value for stylisticians and others interested in the study of literary effect.”
“Chloe Harrison’s Cognitive Grammar in Contemporary Fiction is a creative, expansive,

and carefully constructed work in cognitive stylistics; and since it is the first monograph

by a single author focused on applying Cognitive Grammar (CG) to the analysis of literary

texts, it leads the way in unpacking this complicated and intriguing framework as a

stylistics toolkit.”
“Chloe Harrison’s Cognitive Grammar in Contemporary Fiction is a creative, expansive, and carefully constructed work in cognitive stylistics; and since it is the first monograph by a single author focused on applying Cognitive Grammar (CG) to the analysis of literary texts, it leads the way in unpacking this complicated and intriguing framework as a stylistics toolkit.

References

References

Alford, S.
1995Spaced-out: Signification and space in Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy. Contemporary Literature 36(4): 613–632. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Allington, D.
2007“How come most people don’t see it?”: Slashing The Lord of the Rings. Social Semiotics 17(1): 45–64.Google Scholar
Allington, D. & Swann, J.
2009Researching literary reading as social practice. Language and Literature 18(3): 219–230. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011Reading and social interaction: A critical approach to individual and group reading practices. In The History of Reading, Vol 3: Methods, Strategies, Tactics, R. Crone & S. Towheed (eds), 247–264. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Arnett, C. & Jernigan, H.
2014A Cognitive Grammar account of case for L2 students of German. GFL: 68–93. http://​www​.gfl​-journal​.de​/1​-2014​/Arnett​-Jernigan​.pdf
Atchison, T.
2010“Why I am writing from where you are not”: Absence and presence in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. Journal of Postcolonial Writing 46(3): 359–368. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Atwood, M.
1985[1996]The Handmaid’s Tale. London: Vintage.Google Scholar
Auster, P.
1987[2004]The New York Trilogy. London: Faber and Faber.Google Scholar
Bakhtin, M.
1973Questions of Literature and Aesthetics. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Baldry, A. & Thibault, J.
2006Multimodal Transcription and Text Analysis: A Multimedia Toolkit and Coursebook. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Bartlett, F.
1932Remembering: A Study in Experimental and Social Psychology. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
Belmonte, M. K.
2008Does the experimental scientist have a “Theory of Mind”? Review of General Psychology 12(2): 192–204. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bennett, P.
2014Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar. In The Bloomsbury Companion to Cognitive Linguistics, J. Littlemore & J. R. Taylor (eds), 29–48. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Bergen, B. & Chang, N.
2005Embodied construction grammar in simulation-based language understanding. In Construction Grammars: Cognitive Grounding and Theoretical Extensions [Constructional Approaches to Grammer 3], J. Östman & M. Fried (eds), 147–190. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bergs, A.
2009Contexts and Constructions [Constructional Approaches to Grammer 9]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Berry, M., Butler, C., Fawcett, R. & Huang, G.
(eds) 1996Meaning and Form: Systemic Functional Interpretations. Stamford CT: Ablex.Google Scholar
Bielak, J. & Pawlak, M.
2013Applying Cognitive Grammar in the Foreign Language Classroom: Teaching English Tense and Aspect. New York, NY: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Birkerts, S.
1998Grand delusion. The New York Times, 25 January 1998, <https://​www​.nytimes​.com​/books​/98​/01​/25​/reviews​/980125​.25birkert​.html (30 April 2016).
Broccias, C. & Hollman, W. 2007Do we need summary and sequential scanning in (cognitive) grammar? Cognitive Linguistics 18(4): 487–522. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Browse, S.
2014Resonant metaphor in Never Let Me Go . In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 69–82. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Burke, M.
2011Literary Reading, Cognition and Emotion: An Exploration of the Oceanic Mind. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2014Rhetoric and poetics: The classical heritage of stylistics. In The Routledge Handbook of Stylistics, M. Burke (ed.), 11–30. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Burton, D.
1982Through glass darkly: Through dark glasses. On stylistics and political commitment – via a study of a passage from Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar . In Language and Literature: Reader in Stylistics, R. Carter (ed.), 195–214. London: George Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
Butler, C. S. & Gonzálvez-García, F.
2005Situating FDG in functional-cognitive space: An initial study. In Studies in Functional Discourse Grammar, J. L. Mackenzie & M. de los Ángeles Gómez-González (eds), 109–158. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Carter, R. & Stockwell, P.
2008Stylistics: Retrospect and prospect. In The Language and Literature Reader, R. Carter & P. Stockwell (eds), 291–302. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Carroll, L.
1865Alice in Wonderland. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Chatman, S.
1978Story and Discourse. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Childs, P.
2007Adaptations. In Ian McEwan’s Enduring Love: A Routledge Study Guide, P. Childs (ed.), 123–136. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Churchwell, S.
2011 A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan – Review. The Guardian, 13 March 2011, <http://​www​.guardian​.co​.uk​/books​/2011​/mar​/13​/jennifer‒egan‒visit‒goon‒squad (15 March 2012).
Clark, H. H. & Clark, E. V.
1977Psychology and Language: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics. New York NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
Cobley, P.
2001Narrative. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2012The reactionary art of murder: Contemporary crime fiction, criticism and verisimilitude. Language and Literature 21(3): 286–298. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cockcroft, R. & Cockcroft, S.
1992[2014]Persuading People: An Introduction to Rhetoric, 3rd edn. London: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cook, G.
1994Discourse and Literature. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Crisp, P.
2008Between extended metaphor and allegory: Is blending enough? Language and Literature 17(4): 291–308. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Croft, W.
2001Radical Construction Grammar: Syntactic Theory in Typological Perspective. Oxford: OUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Croft, W. & Cruse, D. A.
2004Cognitive Linguistics. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Currie, M.
1995Metafiction. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Dabrowska, E. & Divjak, E.
2015Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dancygier, B.
2007Narrative anchors and the processes of story construction. Style 41(2): 133–152.Google Scholar
2008The text and the story: Levels of blending in fictional narratives. In Mental Spaces in Discourse and Interaction [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 170], T. Oakley & A. Hougaard (eds), 51–78. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012The Language of Stories: A Cognitive Approach. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
Dancygier, B. & Sweetser, E. 2005Mental Spaces in Grammar: Conditional Constructions. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dancygier, B. & Vandelanotte, L.
2009Judging distances: Mental spaces, distance and viewpoint in literary discourse. In Cognitive Poetics: Goals, Gains and Gaps, G. Brône & J. Vandaele (eds), 319–369. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Diack, H.
1960Reading and the Psychology of Perception. Nottingham: E. H. Lee & Co.Google Scholar
Dickens, C.
1852-1853[1994]Bleak House. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
Dimovitz, S.
2006Public personae and the private I: De-compositional ontology in Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy . Modern Fiction Studies 52(3): 613–633. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dirven, R. & Pörings, R.
2002Metaphor and Metonymy in Comparison and Contrast. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Dodge, E. & Lakoff, G.
2005From linguistic analyses to neural grounding. In From Perception to Meaning: Image Schemas in Cognitive Linguistics, B. Hampe & J. Grady (eds), 57–92. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dolezel, L.
1995Fictional worlds: Density, gaps and inference. Style 29(2): 201–214.Google Scholar
Doloughan, F.
2011Contemporary Narrative: Textual Production, Multimodality and Multiliteracies. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Dowty, D.
1991Thematic proto-roles and argument selection. Language 67: 574–619. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Duchan, J. F., Bruder, G. A. & Hewitt, L. E.
(eds) 1995Deixis in Narrative: A Cognitive Science Perspective. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Egan, J.
1995Invisible Circus. London: Corsair, Constable & Robinson.Google Scholar
2008The Keep. London: Abacus.Google Scholar
2010A Visit from the Goon Squad. New York NY: Knopf Publishing Group.Google Scholar
2011Look at Me. London: Corsair, Constable & Robinson.Google Scholar
Emmott, C.
1992Splitting the referent: An introduction to narrative enactors. In Advances in Systemic Linguistics: Recent Theory and Practice, M. Davies & L. Ravelli (eds), 221–228. London: Pinter.Google Scholar
1995Consciousness and context-building: Narrative inferences and anaphoric theory. In New Essays in Deixis, K. Green (ed.), 81–97. Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
1997Narrative Comprehension: A Discourse Perspective. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
2003Reading for pleasure: A cognitive poetic analysis of ‘twists in the tale’ and other plot reversals in narrative texts. In Cognitive Poetics in Practice, J. Gavins & G. Steen (eds), 145–160. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Emmott, C. & Alexander, M.
2014Foregrounding, burying and plot construction. In The Cambridge Handbook of Stylistics, P. Stockwell & S. Whiteley (eds), 329–343 Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Emmott, C., Sanford, J. A. & Morrow, L. I.
2006Capturing the attention of readers? Stylistic and psychological perspectives on the use and effect of text fragmentation in narratives. Journal of Literary Semantics 35: 1–30. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Evans, V. & Green, M.
2006Cognitive Linguistics: An Introduction. Edinburgh: EUP.Google Scholar
Fauconnier, G.
1985Mental Spaces. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
1997Mappings in Thought and Language. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fillmore, C.
1985Frames and the semantics of understanding. Quaderni di Semantica 6(2): 222–254.Google Scholar
Fillmore, C. 1992Toward a frame-based lexicon: The semantics of RISK and its neighbors. In Frames, Fields and Contrasts: New Essays in Semantic and Lexical Organization, A. Lehrer & E. Kittay (eds), 75–102. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Fitzpatrick, J.
2010Five best book recommendation services. Lifehacker, 25 July 2010, <http://​lifehacker​.com​/5595842​/five​-best​-book​-recommendation​-services (1 December 2010).
Foer, J. S.
2002aEverything Is Illuminated. New York NY: Penguin.Google Scholar
2002b ‘A Primer for the Punctuation of Heart Disease’. In The Unabridged Pocketbook of Lightning, J. S. Foer (ed), 1–9. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
2005Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. New York NY: Penguin.Google Scholar
2006 ‘If the Aging Magician Should Begin to Believe’. In A Convergence of Birds: Original Fiction and Poetry Inspired by Joseph Cornell, J. S. Foer (ed), 203–222. London: Hamish Hamilton.Google Scholar
2010 ‘Here We Aren’t, So Quickly.’ In 20 under 40: Stories from the New Yorker, D. Treisman (ed), 139–144. New York NY: Farrar, Strauss & Giroux. This short story was originally published in The New Yorker (June 14 & 21 2010).Google Scholar
Fokkema, A.
1991Postmodern Characters: A Study of Characterization in British and American Postmodern Fiction. Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
Forceville, C.
1999Educating the eye? Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design (1996) . Language and Literature 8(2): 163–178. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007Pictorial and multimodal metaphor in commercials. In Go Figure! New Directions in Advertising Rhetoric, E. McQuarrie & B. Phillips (eds), 178–204. Armonk: M. E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
2009Multimodal Metaphor. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Forrest, L. B.
1996Discourse goals and attentional processes in sentence production: The dynamic construal of events. In Conceptual Structure, Discourse and Language, A. Goldberg (ed.), 149–161. Stanford CA: CSLI.Google Scholar
Forster, E. M.
1905Aspects of the Novel. Cambridge: Hodder Arnold.Google Scholar
Fowler, R.
1986[1996]Linguistic Criticism, 2nd edn. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Frank, A.
2010Letting Stories Breathe: A Socio-Narratology. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Freeman, M.
1995Metaphor making meaning: Dickinson’s conceptual universe. Journal of Pragmatics 24(6): 643–666. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1997Grounded spaces: Deictic-self anaphors in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. Language and Literature 6(1): 7–28. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Freeman M.
2006The fall of the wall between literary studies and linguistics: Cognitive poetics. In Cognitive Linguistics: Current Applications and Future Perspectives, G. Kristiansen, M. Achard, R. Dirven & F. Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez (eds), 403–428. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Freeman, M.
2007Cognitive linguistic approaches to literary studies: State of the art in cognitive poetics. In The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics, D. Geeraerts & H. Cuyckens (eds), 1175–1202. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Fulford, R.
2010Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad is all about the timing. National Post, 1 December 2010, <http://​arts​.nationalpost​.com​/2012​/01​/10​/jennifer​-egans​-a​-visit​-from​-the​-goon​-squad​-is​-all​-about​-the​-timing/ (15 October 2012).
Fuller, D.
2008Reading as social practice: The beyond the book research project. Journal of Popular Narrative Media 1(2): 211–217. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gaiman, N.
2002Coraline. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Gavins, J. 2000Absurd tricks with bicycle frames in the text world of The Third Policeman . Nottingham Linguistic Circular 15: 17–33.Google Scholar
2003Too much blague? An exploration of text-worlds of Donald Barthelme’s Snow White . In Cognitive Poetics in Practice, J. Gavins & G. Steen (eds), 129–144. London: Routledge. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005(Re)thinking modality: A text-world perspective. Journal of Literary Semantics 34(2): 79–93. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007Text World Theory: An Introduction. Edinburgh: EUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gavins, J. & Stockwell, P.
2012About the heart, where it hurt exactly, and how often. Language and Literature 21(1): 33–50. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Genette, G.
1980Narrative Discourse: An Essay in Method. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
1988Narrative Discourse Revisited. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Gibbons, A.
2008Multimodal literature ‘moves’ us: Dynamic movement and embodiment in VAS: An Opera in Flatland . Hermes 41: 107–124.Google Scholar
2012aMultimodality, Cognition and Experimental Literature. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2012bAltermodernist fiction. In Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature, J. Bray, A. Gibbons & B. McHale (eds), 238–252. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Gibbons, A. & Whiteley, S.
eds Forthcoming. Contemporary Stylistics: Language, Cognition, Interpretation. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Gibbs, R.
2002Feeling moved by metaphor. In Textual Secrets: The Message of the Medium, S. Csabi & J. Zerkowitz (eds), 13–28. Budapest: Eötvös Loránd University.Google Scholar
Giora, R., Fein, O., Aschkenazi, K., and Alkabets–Zlozover, I.
2007Negation in context: A functional approach to suppression. Discourse Processes�43: 153–172. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Giora, R., Heruti, V., Metuki, N. & Fein, O.
2009‘When we say no we mean no’: Interpreting negation in vision and language. Journal of Pragmatics 41(11): 2222–2239. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Giovanelli, M.
2013Text World Theory and Keats’ Poetry: The Cognitive Poetics of Desire, Dreams and Nightmares. London: Bloomsbury Academic.Google Scholar
2014The ‘missive from the trench’: Conceptual proximity and the experience of war in Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘A Working Party.’ In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 145–159. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Giovanelli, M. & Harrison, C.
Forthcoming. Cognitive Grammar in Stylistics: A Practical Guide. London: Bloomsbury.
Goldberg, A.
1995Construction: A Construction Grammar Approach to Argument Structure. Chicago IL: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
1996Conceptual Structure, Discourse and Language. Stanford CA: CSLI.Google Scholar
Gooding, R.
2008“Something very old and very slow”: Coraline, uncanniness, and narrative form. Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 33(4): 390–407. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Green, M., Strange, J. & Brock, T.
2002Narrative Impact: Social and Cognitive Foundations. Mahwah NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Gregoriou, C. 2012 ‘Times like these, I wish there was a real Dexter’: Unpacking serial murder ideologies and metaphors from TV’s Dexter internet forum’. Language and Literature 21(3): 274–285. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Greimas, A. J.
1971Narrative Grammar: Units and Levels. Modern Language Notes 86: 793–806.Google Scholar
1973Les actants, les acteurs et les figures. In Semiotique Narrative et Textuelle, C. Chabrol (ed.), 161–176. Paris: Larousse.Google Scholar
1977Elements of a Narrative Grammar. Diacritics 7: 23–40. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hakemulder, J.
2004Foregrounding and its effects on readers’ perception. Discourse Processes 38: 193–208. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K.
1971Linguistic function and literary style: An inquiry into the language of William Golding’s The Inheritors . In Literary Style: A Symposium, S. Chatman (ed.), 330–365. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
1973Explorations in the Functions of Language. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
1978Language as Social Semiotic. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
1985An Introduction to Functional Grammar. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. & Hasan, R.
1976Cohesion in English. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. & Martin, J.
1993Writing Science: Literacy and Discursive Power. London: Falmer Press.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. & Matthieson, C.
1985[2004]An Introduction to Functional Grammar, 3rd edn. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Hamilton, C.
2003A cognitive grammar of ‘Hospital Barge’ by Wilfred Owen. In Cognitive Poetics in Practice, J. Gavins & G. Steen (eds), 55–65. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2014The cognitive poetics of if . In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 195–212. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hampe, B. & Grady, J.
2005From Perception to Meaning: Image Schemas in Cognitive Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, C.
2014Attentional windowing in ‘The Soul Is Not a Smithy.’ In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 53–67. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Forthcoming. Finding Elizabeth: Construing episodic memory in Elizabeth Is Missing by Emma Healey. Journal of Literary Semantics.
Harrison, C. & Mason, J.
In preparation. Re-imagining innocence? Mind-modelling younger readers in Young Adult fiction.
Harrison, C. & Nuttall, L.
In preparation. Cognitive Grammar and reconstrual: Re-experiencing Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Freeze-Dried Groom’.
Harrison, C., Nuttall, L., Stockwell, P. & Yuan, W.
(eds) 2014Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, C. & Stockwell, P.
2014Cognitive poetics. In The Bloomsbury Companion to Cognitive Linguistics, J. Littlemore & J. Taylor (eds), 218–233. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Hart, C.
2014aConstrual operations in online press reports of political protests. In Contemporary Critical Discourse Studies, C. Hart & P. Cap (eds), 167–188. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
2014bDiscourse, Grammar and Ideology: Functional and Cognitive Perspectives. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Head, D.
1992The Modernist Short Story: A Study in Theory and Practice. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Head, D. 2002The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Fiction, 1950–2000. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007Ian McEwan. Manchester: Manchester University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Healey, E.
2014Elizabeth Is Missing. New York NY: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Heine, B.
1997Cognitive Foundations of Grammar. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Herman, D.
2002Story Logic. Nebraska NE: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
2009aBeyond voice and vision: Cognitive Grammar and focalization theory. In Narratology: Point of View, Perspective, and Focalization: Modeling Mediation in Narrative, P. Hühn, W. Schmid & J. Schönert (eds), 119–142. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
2009bCognitive approaches to narrative analysis. In Cognitive Poetics: Goals, Gains and Gaps, G. Brône & J. Vandaele (eds), 79–118. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
2011The Emergence of Mind: Representations of Consciousness in Narrative Discourse in English. Lincoln NE: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
Herman, D., Manfred, J. & Ryan, M.-L.
(eds) 2005The Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hidalgo-Downing, L.
2000aNegation, Text Worlds and Discourse: The Pragmatics of Fiction. Stamford CT: Ablex.Google Scholar
2000bNegation in discourse: A text world approach to Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 . Language and Literature 9(3): 215–240. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hoeken, H. & van Vliet, M.
2000Suspense, curiosity and surprise: How discourse structure influences the affective and cognitive processing of a story. Poetics 27(4): 277–286. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hoeksema, J., Rullmann, H., Sánchez-Valencia, V. & van der Wouden, T.
(eds) 2001Perspectives on Negation and Polarity Items [Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today 40]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hoekstra, T. & Sybesma, R.
2004Arguments and Structure: Studies on the Architecture of the Sentence. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Hollman, W. B.
2013Nouns and verbs in Cognitive Grammar: Where is the ‘sound’ evidence? Cognitive Linguistics 24(2): 275–308. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Horn, L.
1989A Natural History of Negation. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
2010The Expression of Negation. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
House, C.
2011 A Visit from the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan: Ambitious dispatches from America’s nattiest frontier. The Independent, 13 March 2011, <http://​www​.independent​.co​.uk​/arts‒entertainment​/books​/reviews​/a‒visit‒from‒the‒goon‒squad‒by‒jennifer‒egan‒2240306​.html (15 October 2012).
Iser, W.
1978The Act of Reading. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Ishiguro, K.
2005Never Let Me Go. London: Faber and Faber.Google Scholar
Jackendoff, R.
1987On beyond zebra: The relation of linguistic and visual information. Cognition 26(2): 89–114. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ji, Y. & Shen, D.
2004Transitivity and mental transformation: Sheila Watson’s The Double Hook . Language and Literature 13(4): 335–348. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jones, G. & Ells, K.
2011Chaos and complexity in Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy . In Restoring the Mystery of the Rainbow: Literature’s Refraction of Science, C. Barfoot & V. Tinkler (eds), 627–640. Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
Kamp, H. & Reyle, U.
2003From Discourse to Logic. Dordrecht: Kluwer.Google Scholar
Kaveney, R. 2009Mother shudder. The Times Literary Supplement, 5 June 2009, <http://​entertainment​.timesonline​.co​.uk​/tol​/arts​_and​_entertainment​/the​_tls​/article6437999​.ece (28 April 2009).
Kay, P. & Fillmore, C.
1999Grammatical constructions and linguistic generalisations: The what’s doing X to Y? construction. Language 75(1): 1–33. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kennedy, C.
1982Systemic grammar and its use in literary analysis. In Language and Literature: An Introductory Reader in Stylistics, R. Carter (ed.), 82–99. London: George Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
Kimmel, M.
2011From text-linguistics to literary actants – the force dynamics of (emotional) vampirism. Language and Cognition 3(2): 235–282. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Klapcsik, S.
2008Neil Gaiman’s irony, liminal fantasies, and fairy tale adaptations. Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies 14(2): 317–334.Google Scholar
Knox, J.
2010Jonathan Safran Foer. The New Yorker, 14 June 2010, <http://​www​.newyorker​.com​/magazine​/2010​/06​/14​/jonathan​-safran​-foer (27 May 2015).
Köhler, W.
1947Gestalt Psychology. New York NY: New American Library.Google Scholar
Kövecses, Z.
2002Metaphor: A Practical Introduction. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Kress, G. R. & van Leeuwen, T.
2006Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Kristeva, J.
1981A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Kuiken, D. & Miall, D. S.
1994Foregrounding, defamiliarisation and affect: Response to literary stories. Poetics 22: 389–407. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kuiken, D., Miall. D. S. & Sikora, S.
2004Forms of self-implication in literary reading. Poetics Today 25(2): 171–203. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Laberge, D.
1983Spatial extent of attention to letters and words. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 9(3): 371–379.Google Scholar
Labov, W.
1972Language and the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular. Philadelphia PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Lahey, E.
2004All the world’s a subworld: Direct speech and subworld creation in ‘After’ by Norman MacCaig. Nottingham Linguistic Circular: 21–28.Google Scholar
Lakoff, G.
1987Women, Fire and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal about the Mind. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, G. & Johnson, M.
1980Metaphors We Live By. Chicago IL: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Langacker, R.
1987Foundations of Cognitive Grammar, Vol. 1: Theoretical Prerequisites. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
1990Concept, Image, and Symbol: The Cognitive Basis of Grammar. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
1991Foundations of Cognitive Grammar, Vol. 2: Descriptive Application. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
1993aUniversals of construal. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society 19: 447–463. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1999aVirtual reality. Studies in the Linguistics Sciences 29(2): 77–103.Google Scholar
2001Discourse in Cognitive Grammar. Cognitive Linguistics 12(2): 143–188. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction. Oxford: OUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009Cognitive Linguistics Research: Investigations in Cognitive Grammar. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lavender, W. 1993The novel of critical engagement: Paul Auster’s City of Glass . Contemporary Literature 34(2): 219–239. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lehrer, A. & Kittay, E.
(eds) 1992Frames, Fields and Contrasts: New Essays in Semantic and Lexical Organization. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Leinfeller, E.
1994The broader perspective of negation. Journal of Literary Semantics 13(2): 77–98.Google Scholar
Lewis, C. S.
1950–1956The Chronicles of Narnia. London: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Little, W.
1997Nothing to go on: Paul Auster’s City of Glass . Contemporary Literature 38(1): 133–163. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Littlemore, J. & Taylor, J. R.
2014Introduction. In The Bloomsbury Companion to Cognitive Linguistics, J. Littlemore & J. R. Taylor (eds), 1–26. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Ljungberg, C.
2015Iconicity. In The Bloomsbury Companion to Stylistics, V. Sotirova (ed.), 476–489. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Long, E.
2003Book Clubs – Women and the Uses of Reading in Everyday Life. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
March-Russell, P.
2009The Short Story: An Introduction. Edinburgh: EUP.Google Scholar
Mars-Jones, A.
1999I think I’m right, therefore I am. The Guardian, 7 September 1999, <http://​www​.theguardian​.com​/books​/1999​/sep​/07​/fiction​.reviews (30 April 2016).
Martin, T.
2011Jennifer Egan: Profile. The Telegraph, 25 March 2011, <http://​www​.telegraph​.co​.uk​/culture​/books​/bookreviews​/8403574​/Jennifer​-Egan​-Profile​.html (15 October 2012).
Martínez, M. A.
2014Storyworld possible selves and the phenomenon of narrative immersion: Testing a new theoretical construct. Narrative 22: 110–131. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mason, J.
2014Narrative. In Cambridge Handbook of Stylistics, P. Stockwell & S. Whiteley (eds), 179–195. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Forthcoming. Intertextuality in Practice. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Mather, G.
2006Foundations of Perception. London: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Matlock, T.
2004Fictive motion as cognitive stimulation. Memory and Cognition 32(8): 1389–1400. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2010Abstract motion is no longer abstract. Language and Cognition 2(2): 243–260. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Matsumoto, N.
2008Bridges between cognitive linguistics and second language pedagogy: The case of corpora and their potential. SKY Journal of Linguistics 21: 125–153.Google Scholar
McEwan, I.
1997Enduring Love. London: Vintage.Google Scholar
McHale, B.
1989Postmodernist Fiction. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
1992Constructing Postmodernism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2012Postmodernism and experiment. In Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature, J. Bray, A. Gibbons & B. McHale (eds), 141–153. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
McIntyre, D.
2006Point of View in Plays. A Cognitive Stylistic Approach to Viewpoint in Drama and Other Text-types [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 3]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Miall, D. S.
2006Literary Reading: Empirical and Theoretical Studies. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
1990Readers’ responses to narrative: Evaluating, relating, anticipating. Poetics 19: 323–339. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Miall, D. S. & Kuiken, D.
1999What is literariness? Three components of literary reading. Discourse Processes 28(2): 121–138. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2002A feeling for fiction: Becoming what we behold. Poetics 30(4): 221–241. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mills, S. 2002Feminist Stylistics. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Nahajec, L.
2009Negation and the creation of implicit meaning in poetry. Language and Literature 18(2): 109–127. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nesset, T.
2009 Review of Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction (2008), R. Langacker. Journal of Linguistics 45(2): 477–480.Google Scholar
Nicol, B.
2009The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodern Fiction. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nikolajeva, M.
2009Devils, demons, familiars, friends: Toward a semiotics of literary cats. Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies 23(2): 248–267.Google Scholar
Nørgaard, N.
2007Disordered collarettes and uncovered tables: Negative polarity as a stylistic device in Joyce’s “Two Gallants”. Journal of Literary Semantics, 36(1): 35–52. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nuttall, L.
2014Constructing a text world for The Handmaid’s Tale . In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan. (eds), 83–99. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2015Attributing minds to vampires in Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend. Language and Literature 24(1): 23–39. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nuyts, J.
2007Cognitive linguistics and functional linguistics. In The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics, D. Geeraerts & H. Cuyckens (eds), 543–565. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Oakley, T.
2014Afterword: From Cognitive Grammar to systems rhetoric. In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 231–236. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Östman, J. & Fried, M.
(eds) 2005Construction Grammars: Cognitive Grounding and Theoretical Extensions [Constructional Approaches to Language 3]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Padley, S.
2006Key Concepts in Contemporary Literature. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Palmer, A.
2004Fictional Minds. Lincoln NE: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
2009Attributions of Madness in Ian McEwan’s Enduring Love. Style 43(3): 291–308.Google Scholar
Paradis, C.
2005Ontologies and construals in lexical semantics. Axiomathes 15(4): 541–573. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Parsons, E., Sawers, N. & McInally, K.
2008The Other Mother: Neil Gaiman’s postfeminist fairytales. Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 33(4): 371–389. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pavel, T.
1973Some remarks on narrative grammars. Poetics 2(4): 5–30. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Peplow, D.
2012‘Oh, I’ve known a lot of Irish people’: Reading groups and the negotiation of literary interpretation. Language and Literature 20(4): 295–315. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pleyer, M. & Schneider, C.
2014Construal, cognition, and comics: Analysing the multimodal construction of a Gothic autobiography in Alison Blechdel’s Fun Home . In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 35–52. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Prince, G.
1973A Grammar of Stories. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
Propp, V.
1968Morphology of the Folktale. Austin TX: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Pullman, P.
RA–RE
2008–2012Goodreads: Coraline reviews, December 2008 – January 2012, <http://​www​.goodreads​.com​/book​/show​/17061​.Coraline (15 February 2012).
2006–2012Amazon: Coraline reviews, April 2006 – April 2012, <http://​www​.amazon​.com​/Coraline​-Neil​-Gaiman​/dp​/0061649694 (17 April 2012).
R1–R6
2008–2012Goodreads: The New York Trilogy reviews. February 2008 – April 2012, <http://​www​.goodreads​.com​/book​/show​/431​.The​_New​_York​_Trilogy (15 February 2012).
R7–R11
2005–2012Amazon: The New York Trilogy reviews, September 2005 – September 2012, <http://​www​.amazon​.co​.uk​/New​-York​-Trilogy​-Paul​-Auster​/dp​/0571276652 (17 April 2012).
Rapp, D. N. & Gerrig, R. J.
2006Predilections for narrative outcomes: The impact of story contexts and reader preferences. Journal of Memory and Language 54: 54–67. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richardson, B.
2002Beyond story and discourse: Narrative time in postmodern and nonmimetic fiction. In Narrative Dynamics: Essays on Time, Plot, Closure and Frames, B. Richardson (ed.), 47–63. Columbus OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
2006Unnatural Voices: Extreme Narration in Modern and Contemporary Fiction. Columbus OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
Ridley, M.
2009Foreword: Ian McEwan and the Rational Mind. In Ian McEwan Contemporary Critical Perspectives, S. Groes (ed), vii–xii. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Rowen, N.
1991The detective in search of the lost tongue of Adam: Paul Auster’s City of Glass . Critique 32(4): 224–234.Google Scholar
Rowling, J. K.
1997–2007The Harry Potter series. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Rubba, J.
1996Alternate grounds in the interpretation of deictic expressions. In Spaces, Worlds, and Grammars, G. Fauconnier & E. Sweetser (eds), 227–261. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Rudd, D.
2008An eye for an I: Neil Gaiman’s Coraline and questions of identity. Children’s Literature in Education 39: 159–168. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Russell, A.
1990Deconstructing The New York Trilogy . Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 31(2): 71–84.Google Scholar
Ryan, M. L.
1998The text as world versus the text as game: Possible worlds semantics and postmodern theory. Journal of Literary Semantics 27(3): 137–163. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sánchez-García, J.
2007Toward a cognitively-oriented discourse analysis: Framing, construal and violence-related emotional meaning. In Cognitive Linguistics in Critical Discourse Analysis, C. Hart & D. Lukeš (eds), 207–231. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
Schank, R.
1982Reading and Understanding. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Schank, R. & Abelson, R.
1977Scripts, Plans, Goals and Understanding. An Inquiry into Human Knowledge Structures. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Schemberg, C.
2002Achieving ‘At-One-Ment’: Storytelling and the Concept of the Self in Ian McEwan’s The Child in Time, Black Dogs, Enduring Love and Atonement. Frankfurt: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Segal, E.
2010Closure in detective fiction. Poetics Today 31(2): 153–215. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1995Narrative comprehension and the role of deictic shift theory. In Deixis in Narrative: A Cognitive Science Perspective, J. F. Duchan, G. A. Bruder & L. E. Hewitt (eds), 3–17. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Semino, E.
1995Schema theory and the analysis of text worlds in poetry. Language and Literature 4(2): 79–108. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008A cognitive stylistic approach to mind style in narrative fiction. In The Language and Literature Reader, R. Carter & P. Stockwell (eds), 268–277. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Semino, E. 2014Pragmatic failure, mind style and characterisation in fiction about autism. Language and Literature 23(2): 141–158. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Semino, E. & Short, M.
2004Corpus Stylistics: Speech, Writing and Thought Presentation in a Corpus of English Writing. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Shiloh, L.
2002Paul Auster and the Postmodern Quest: On the Road to Nowhere. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
2010Double, the Labyrinth, and the Locked Room: Metaphors of Paradox in Crime Fiction and Film. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Short, M. & van Peer, W.
1989Accident! Stylisticians evaluate: Aims and methods of stylistics analysis. In Reading, Analysing and Teaching Literature, M. Short (ed.), 22–71. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Simpson, P.
2004Stylistics: A Resource Book for Students. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2014Just what is narrative urgency? Language and Literature 23(1): 3–22. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Simpson, P. & Canning, P.
2014Action and event. In The Cambridge Handbook of Stylistics, P. Stockwell & S. Whiteley (eds), 281–299. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Smethurst, P.
2000The Postmodern Chronotype: Reading Space and Time in Contemporary Fiction. Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
Steen, G.
1989Metaphor and literary comprehension: Towards a discourse theory of metaphor in literature. Poetics 18(1–2): 113–141. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1991The empirical study of literary reading: Methods of data collection. Poetics 20(5–6): 559–575. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stockwell, P.
2000The Poetics of Science Fiction. London: Longman.Google Scholar
2002Cognitive Poetics: An Introduction. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2007(Sur)real stylistics: From text to contextualising. In The Language and Literature Reader, R. Carter & P. Stockwell (eds), 198–208. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2009Texture: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Reading. Edinburgh: EUP.Google Scholar
2014War, worlds and Cognitive Grammar. In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 17–34. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stockwell, P. & Mahlberg, M.
2015Mind-modelling with corpus stylistics in David Copperfield . Language and Literature 24(2): 129–147. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Styles, E.
2006The Psychology of Attention. New York NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Swann, J. & Allington, D.
2009Reading groups and the language of literary texts: A case study in social reading. Language and Literature 18(3): 247–264. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tabakowska, E.
1993Cognitive Linguistics and Poetics of Translation. Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
Tabkowska, E.
2014Point of view in translation: Lewis Carroll’s Alice in grammatical wonderlands. In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 101–116. New York: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Talmy, L.
1988Force dynamics in language and cognition. Cognitive Science 12(1): 49–100. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2000aTowards a Cognitive Semantics, Vol. 1: Concept Structuring Systems. Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
2000bTowards a Cognitive Semantics, Vol. II: Typology and Process in Concept Structuring. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
Talmy, L. 2008Aspects of attention in language. In The Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics, P. Robinson (ed.), 27–38. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2011Cognitive Semantics: An overview. In Semantics: An International Handbook of Natural Language Meaning, C. Maienborn, K. von Heusinger & P. Portner (eds), 622–642. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, J.
2002Cognitive Grammar. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Thomas, J. & Short, M.
(eds) 1996Using Corpora for Language Research. Studies in Honour of Geoffrey Leech. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Tobin, V.
2009Cognitive bias and the poetics of surprise. Language and Literature 18(2): 155–172. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Todorov, T.
1977The Poetics of Prose. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Tomashevsky, B.
2002Story, plot and motivation. In Narrative Dynamics: Essays on Time, Plot, Closure and Frames, B. Richardson (ed.), 164–178. Columbus OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
Toolan, M.
1988[2001]Narrative: A Critical Linguistic Introduction, 2nd edn. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Traugott, E. & Pratt, M.
2008Language, linguistics and literary analysis. In The Language and Literature Reader, R. Carter & P. Stockwell (eds), 39–48. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Tsur, R.
1992Towards a Theory of Cognitive Poetics. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Uspensky, B.
1973A Poetics of Composition [trans. V. Zavarin & S. Wittig]. Berkeley CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
van Peer, W. & Chatman, S.
(eds) 2001New Perspectives on Narrative Perspective. New York NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
van Peer, W. Hakemulder, J. & Zyngier, S.
2007Lines on feeling: Foregrounding, aesthetics and meaning. Language and Literature 16(2): 197–213. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
van Vliet, S.
2009Reference points and dominions in narrative: A discourse level exploration of the reference point model of anaphora. In New Directions in Cognitive Linguistics [Human Cognitive Processing 24], V. Evans & S. Pourcel (eds), 441–464. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Verhagen, A.
2007Construal and perspectivization. In The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics, D. Geeraerts & H. Cuyckens (eds), 48–81. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
Wales, K.
1990[2001]A Dictionary of Stylistics, 2nd edn. London: Longman.Google Scholar
2014The stylistics tool-kit: Methods and sub-disciplines. In The Cambridge Handbook of Stylistics, P. Stockwell & S. Whiteley (eds), 13–31. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Waugh, P.
2002Metafiction: The Theory and Practice of Self-Conscious Fiction. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Wells, H. G.
1898The War of the Worlds. London: William Heinemann.Google Scholar
Werth, P.
1995aHow to build a world (in a lot less than six days, using only what’s in your head). In New Essays in Deixis: Discourse, Narrative, Literature, K. Green (ed.), 49–80. Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
1995b‘World enough and time’: Deictic space and the interpretation of prose. In Twentieth Century Fiction: From Text to Context, P. Verdonk & J. Weber (eds), 181–205. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
1999Text Worlds: Representing Conceptual Space in Discourse. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Whiteley, S.
2011Text World Theory, real readers and emotional responses to The Remains of the Day . Language and Literature 20(1): 23–42. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Whiteley, S. 2014Ethics and alternativity. In The Cambridge Handbook of Stylistics, P. Stockwell & S. Whiteley (eds), 393–407. Cambridge: CUP. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wójcik-Leese, E.
2000Salient ordering of free verse and its translation. Language and Literature 9(2): 170–181. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Yuan, W.
2014Fictive motion in Wordsworthian nature. In Cognitive Grammar in Literature [Linguistic Approaches to Literature 17], C. Harrison, L. Nuttall, P. Stockwell & W. Yuan (eds), 177–194. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zunshine, L.
2006Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel. Columbus OH: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
Zwaan, R.
1993Aspects of Literary Comprehension [Utrecht Publications in General and Comparative Literature 35]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2017.  In Free Indirect Style in Modernism [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 29], Crossref logo
No author info given
2019.  In Intertextuality in Practice [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 33], Crossref logo
No author info given
2021.  In Style and Reader Response [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 36], Crossref logo
No author info given
2021.  In Style and Reader Response [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 36], Crossref logo
Gibbons, Alison & Andrea Macrae
2018.  In Pronouns in Literature,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Giovanelli, Marcello
2018. ‘Something happened, something bad’: Blackouts, uncertainties and event construal in The Girl on the Train. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 27:1  pp. 38 ff. Crossref logo
Harrison, Chloe & Louise Nuttall
2019.  In Experiencing Fictional Worlds [Linguistic Approaches to Literature, 32],  pp. 135 ff. Crossref logo
Kreischer, Kim-Sue
2019. The relation and function of discourses: a corpus-cognitive analysis of the Irish abortion debate. Corpora 14:1  pp. 105 ff. Crossref logo
Liu, Xingbing
2020. Book Review: Louise Nuttall, Mind Style and Cognitive Grammar: Language and Worldview in Speculative Fiction. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 29:2  pp. 171 ff. Crossref logo
Lugea, Jane
2018. The year’s work in stylistics 2017. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 27:4  pp. 329 ff. Crossref logo
Martinez, Maria-Angeles & Luc Herman
2020. Real readers reading Wasco’s ‘City’: A storyworld possible selves approach. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 29:2  pp. 147 ff. Crossref logo
Rundquist, Eric
2020. The Cognitive Grammar of drunkenness: Consciousness representation in Under the Volcano. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 29:1  pp. 39 ff. Crossref logo
Shurma, Svitlana & Wei-lun Lu
2018. The cognitive potential of antithesis. English Text Construction 11:1  pp. 141 ff. Crossref logo
Statham, Simon & Rocío Montoro
2019. The year’s work in stylistics 2018. Language and Literature: International Journal of Stylistics 28:4  pp. 354 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 29 october 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Linguistics

Cognitive linguistics

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: DSA – Literary theory
BISAC Subject: LIT006000 – LITERARY CRITICISM / Semiotics & Theory
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017006521 | Marc record