Language Centres

Their roles, functions and management

| Griffith University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027219572 (Eur) | EUR 105.00
ISBN 9781588110947 (USA) | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027298171 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Language centres serve an important role in the development and implementation of language policy and in supporting language teachers. This book describes five language centres, the Centre for Information on Language Teaching and Research (London), the European Centre for Modern Languages (Graz), the Regional Language Centre (Singapore), the National Foreign Language Center (NFLC, Washington DC), and the Centre for Applied Linguistics and Languages (CALL, Brisbane). These contrasting centres provide the basis for a discussion of the roles, functions and management of language centres and the challenges facing such centres (and universities in general) arising from tensions between the pursuit of academic excellence and the demands of commercialisation and economic rationalism. The author holds a chair in applied linguistics in Griffith University and has written extensively on language policy and its implementation and on language assessment. He has established and directed three language centres since the mid-1980s, including CALL since 1990, and is an Adjunct Fellow of NFLC.
[Language International World Directory, 5]  2001.  x, 241 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix
The language centre concept
1–6
The National Foreign Language Center (NFLC), Washington DC, United States of America
7–38
The Centre for Information on Language Teaching and Research (CILT), London, United Kingdom
39–62
The European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML), Graz, Austria
63–84
The SEAMEO Regional Language Centre (RELC), Singapore
85–107
The Centre for Applied Linguistics and Languages (CALL), Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
109–157
A comparative view of five language centres
159–172
Issues to consider in establishing and developing a language centre
173–231
References
233–237
Name index
239–241
Subject index
ny
“David Ingram's Langauge Centres is the first significant text, I believe, which provides a perspective on and review of a range of language centres. [...] Professor Ingram's drives home his sagacious recommendations from a variety of perspectives, not the least of which is a passing profile of a centre that failed.”
“[...] 'Language Centres' is required reading for persons and organizations interested in establishing or expanding a language center. Persons interested in language policy, curricular reform, and research facilities will also find the book an invaluable resource.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

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2004. Language Planning and Language Teaching: Contributions by David Ingram. Current Issues in Language Planning 5:4  pp. 455 ff. Crossref logo
Baldauf, Richard B.
2004. Issues of Prestige and Image in Language-in-Education Planning in Australia. Current Issues in Language Planning 5:4  pp. 376 ff. Crossref logo
Hatoss, Anikó
2004. Promoting Diversity through Language-in-Education Policies: Focus on Australia and the European Union. Current Issues in Language Planning 5:4  pp. 438 ff. Crossref logo
Hatoss, Anikó & Denis Cunningham
2004. Introduction. Current Issues in Language Planning 5:4  pp. 351 ff. Crossref logo
Sussex, Roland
2004. The Repositioning of Language Centres: An Appreciation of David Ingram’s Language Centres: Their Roles, Functions and Management. Current Issues in Language Planning 5:4  pp. 457 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2001037891