Article published in:
Narrative Inquiry
Vol. 24:2 (2014) ► pp. 328346
References
Antaki, C., & Widdicombe, S
(Eds.) (1998) Identities in Talk. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Avni, S
(2013) Homeland tour guide narratives and the discursive construction of the diasporic. Narrative Inquiry, 23(2), 227–244. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bamberg, M
(1997) Positioning between structure and performance. Journal of Narrative and Life History, 71, 335–342. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bamberg, M., De Fina, A., & Schiffrin, D
(Eds.) (2007) Selves and identities in narrative discourse. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bamberg, M., & Georgakopoulou, A
(2008) Small stories as a new perspective in narrative and identity analysis. Text & Talk, 28(3), 377–396. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bedford, L
(2001) Storytelling: The real work of museums. Curator: The Museum Journal, 44(1), 27–34. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Blomberg, H., & Börjesson, M
(2013) The chronological I: The use of time as a rhetorical resource when doing identity in bullying narratives. Narrative Inquiry, 23(2), 245–261. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Boyd, E., & Heritage, J
(2006) Taking the history: Questioning during comprehensive history taking. In J. Heritage & D.W. Maynard (Eds.), Communication in medical care: Interaction between primary care physicians and patients (pp. 151–184). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bruner, J
(1990) Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Bucholtz, M., & Hall, K
(2005) Identity and interaction: A sociocultural linguistic approach. Discourse Studies, 7(4-5), 585–614. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Clift, R
(1999) Irony in conversation. Language in Society, 281, 523–553. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
De Stefani, E., & Mondada, L
(2014) Reorganizing mobile formations: When “guided” participants initiate reorientations in guided tours. Space and Culture, 17(2), 157–175. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Deppermann, A
(2013) How to get a grip on identities-in-interaction: (What) does ‘positioning’ offer more than ‘membership categorization’? Evidence from a mock story. Narrative Inquiry, 23(1), 62–88. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Drew, P., & Heritage, J
(Eds.) (1992) Talk at work: Interaction in institutional settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ford, C.E
(2010) Questioning in meetings: Participation and positioning. In A.F. Freed & S. Ehrlich (Eds.), “Why do you ask?”: The function of questions in institutional discourse (pp. 211–234). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Freed, A.F., & Ehrlich, S
(Eds.) (2010) “Why do you ask?”: The function of questions in institutional discourse. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Goffman, E
(1974) Frame analysis: An essay on the organization of experience. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
(1981) Forms of Talk. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C
(1984) Notes on the story structure and organization of participation. In J.M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of social action: Studies in conversation analysis (pp. 225–246). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(2003) Pointing as situated practice. In S. Kita (Ed.), Pointing: Where language, culture, and cognition meet (pp. 217–241). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C., & Goodwin, M.H
(2004) Participation. In A. Duranti (Ed.), A companion to linguistic anthropology (pp. 222–243). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
Grinder, A.L., & McCoy, E.S
(1985) The good guide: A sourcebook for interpreters, docents and tour guides. Scottsdale, AZ: Ironwood Publishing.Google Scholar
Heritage, J
(1984) A change-of-state-token and aspects of its sequential placement. In J.M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of social action: Studies in conversation analysis (pp. 299–345). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(2004) Conversation analysis and institutional talk. In K.L. Fitch & R.E. Sanders (Eds.), Handbook of language and social interaction (pp. 103–146). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
(2012) Epistemics in action: Action formation and territories of knowledge. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 45(1), 1–29. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J., & Roth, A
(1995) Grammar and institution: Questions and questioning in the broadcast news interview. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 281, 1–60. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jacoby, S., & Ochs, E
(1995) Co-construction: An introduction. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 28(3), 171–184. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Johnstone, B
(1994) Repetition in discourse: A dialogue. In B. Johnstone (Ed.), Repetition in discourse: Interdisciplinary perspectives (Vol. 11, pp. 1–20). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C., & Wilkinson, S
(2003) Constructing identities: A feminist conversation analytic approach to positioning in interaction. In R. Harré & F.M. Moghaddam (Eds.), The self and others (pp. 157–180). Westport, CT: Praeger.Google Scholar
Koike, C
(2010) Ellipsis and action in a Japanese joint storytelling series: Gaze, pointing, and context. In P. Szatrowski (Ed.), Storytelling across Japanese conversational genre (pp. 61–112). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Labov, W
(1972) The transformation of experience in narrative syntax. In W. Labov (Ed.), Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular (pp. 354–396). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Lerner, G.H
(1995) Turn design and organization of participation in instructional activities. Discourse Processes, 191, 111–131. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, G.H., & Kitzinger, C
(2007) Extraction and aggregation in the repair of individual and collective self-reference. Discourse Studies, 9(4), 526–557. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mandelbaum, J
(2012) Storytelling in conversation. In J. Sidnell & T. Stivers (Eds.), The handbook of conversation analysis (pp. 492–510). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
McNeill, D
(1992) Hand and mind: What gestures reveal about thought. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Mehan, H
(1979) “What time is it, Denise?”: Asking known information questions in classroom discourse. Theory into Practice, 18(4), 285–294. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mondada, L
(2013) Displaying, contesting and negotiating epistemic authority in social interaction: Descriptions and questions in guided visits. Discourse Studies, 15(5), 1–30. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Niiya, B
(Ed.) (1993) Encyclopedia of Japanese American history: An a-to-z reference from 1868 to the present. New York: Fact on File.Google Scholar
Norrick, N
(2000) Conversational narrative: Storytelling in everyday talk. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2013) Stories of vicarious experience in speeches by Barack Obama. Narrative Inquiry, 23(2), 283–301. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ochs, E
(1992) Indexing gender. In A. Duranti & C. Goodwin (Eds.), Rethinking context: Language as an interactive phenomenon (pp. 335–358). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(1996) Linguistic resources for socializing humanity. In J.J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (Eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (pp. 407–437). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(1997) Narrative. In T.A. Van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse as structure and process (pp. 185–207). London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
Ochs, E., & Capps, L
(2001) Living narrative: Creating lives in everyday storytelling. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, A
(1984) Agreeing and disagreeing with assessments: Some features of preferred/dispreferred turn shapes. In J.M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of social action: Studies in conversation analysis (pp. 57–101). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(1986) Extreme case formulations: A way of legitimizing claims. Human Studies, 91, 219–230. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, L.C
(1997) From knowledge to narrative: Educators and the changing museum. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H
(1974) An analysis of a course of a joke’s telling in conversation. In R. Bauman & J. Sherzer (Eds.), Explorations in the ethnography of speaking (pp. 337–353). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E.A
(2007) Sequence organization in interaction Vol. 1: A primer in conversation analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schiffrin, D
(1988) Discourse markers. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Selting, M
(2007) Lists as embedded structures and the prosody of list construction as an interactional resource. Journal of Pragmatics, 391, 483–526. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stivers, T
(2008) Stance, alignment and affiliation during story telling: When nodding is a token of preliminary affiliation. Research on Language in Social Interaction, 41(1), 29–55. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2010) An overview of the question-response system in American English conversation. Journal of Pragmatics, 42(10), 2772–2781. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E., & Edwards, D
(2008) Silly questions and their answers in police-suspect interrogations. Discourse Studies, 101, 89–111. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Szatrowski, P.E
(Ed.) (2010) Storytelling across Japanese conversational genre. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Vom Lehn, D., & Heath, C
(2007) Social interaction in museums and galleries: A note on video-based field studies. In R. Goldman, R. Pea, B. Barron & S.J. Derry (Eds.), Video research in the learning sciences (pp. 287–301). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Yamazaki, K., Yamazaki, A., Okada, M., Kuno, Y., Kobayashi, Y., Hoshi, Y., Pitsch, K., Luff, P., Vom Lehn, D., & Heath, C
(2009) Revealing Gauguin: Engaging visitors in robot guide’s explanation in an art museum. Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on human factors in computing systems (pp. 1437–1446). New York: Association for Computing Machinery.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 8 other publications

Burdelski, Matthew
2016. We-focused and I-focused stories of World War II in guided tours at a Japanese American museum. Discourse & Society 27:2  pp. 156 ff. Crossref logo
Burdelski, Matthew & Chie Fukuda
2019. Multimodal membership categorization and storytelling in a guided tour. Pragmatics and Society 10:3  pp. 337 ff. Crossref logo
Hosoda, Yuri & David Aline
2018. Embodied departure from focal objects in a lingua franca campus tour. Pragmatics and Society 9:3  pp. 454 ff. Crossref logo
Hosoda, Yuri & David Aline
2021. Establishing joint attention with multimodal resources in lingua franca guided tours. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction 31  pp. 100547 ff. Crossref logo
Noy, Chaim
2021. Narrative affordances. Narrative Inquiry 31:2  pp. 287 ff. Crossref logo
Specht, Inga & Franziska Loreit
2021. Empirical Knowledge About Person-Led Guided Tours in Museums: A Scoping Review. Journal of Interpretation Research 26:2  pp. 96 ff. Crossref logo
Ta, Binh Thanh & Anna Filipi
2020. Storytelling as a resource for pursuing understanding and agreement in doctoral research supervision meetings. Journal of Pragmatics 165  pp. 4 ff. Crossref logo
Thanh Ta, Binh
2021. A conversation analytical study of story-openings in advice-giving episodes in doctoral research supervision meetings. Discourse Studies 23:2  pp. 213 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 10 april 2022. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.