Dynamic Variation in Second Language Acquisition

A language processing perspective

| University of Sydney
HardboundForthcoming
ISBN 9789027210524 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027259769 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Dynamic Variation in Second Language Acquisition makes a cutting-edge contribution to knowledge about how second language learners develop their second language. Drawing comprehensively on Processability Theory’s theoretical understanding that individual variation dynamically interacts with ordered stages of language acquisition, the book provides an informative, critical analysis of historical and contemporary debates about the role of variation in linguistic variation, particularly second language variation. Richly illustrated with a forensic year-long study of how eight adolescent learners of English vary in their acquisition of syntax and morphology, this monograph shows that learners vary in their timing of development between two distinct learner types along a continuum and without skipping stages. The book uncovers how learner variation is dynamic and quite (although not entirely) systematic and how this variation contributes to change in the second language. It will be essential reading for researchers, students, and practitioners.
[Processability Approaches to Language Acquisition Research & Teaching, 8]  Expected August 2021.  xv, 274 pp.
Publishing status: Printing
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
xiii–xiv
Acknowledgements
xv
Chapter 1. The challenge of dynamic variation in language processing
1–34
Chapter 2. Contemporary lenses on variation in SLA
35–54
Chapter 3. Origins of L2 variation as a dynamic linguistic system
55–64
Chapter 4. Dynamic variation as a dimension of processability
65–106
Chapter 5. A methodology for studying dynamic variation
107–124
Chapter 6. Dynamic variation in simplifying developmental problems
125–168
Chapter 7. Dynamic variation in developmental style
169–218
Chapter 8. Processability and developmental change
219–240
Chapter 9. The contribution of dynamic variation to SLA
241–248
References
249–256
Appendix
257–264
Name index
265–266
Subject index
267–274
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BIC Subject: CFD – Psycholinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009040 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Psycholinguistics
ONIX Metadata
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ONIX 3.0
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