From Logic to Rhetoric

Translated from the French original edition, Paris, 1982

PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027225535 (Eur) | EUR 68.00
ISBN 9781556190025 (USA) | USD 102.00
 
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ISBN 9789027279316 | EUR 68.00 | USD 102.00
 
What is language, and how has it been conceived since Frege? How did the development of thought about language lead to a renewed interest in rhetoric in the twentieth century and ultimately to the ‘problematological synthesis’? These are the main questions treated in this book. A constant intertwining of historical and topical viewpoints characterizes the author’s approach.
[Pragmatics & Beyond, VII:3]  1986.  ix, 147 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1
Part One: Logic and Language
3
1. Frege or the Recourse to Formalization
3
1.1. Logic before Frege
3
1.2. Function and concept
5
1.3. The ideography and the principles of Fregean language theory
7
1.4. Sense and reference
8
1.5. Sense and meaning
10
1.6. Conclusion
14
2. Russell's Synthesis
17
2.1. Formalization and natural language
17
2.2. Definite descriptions
19
2.3. Propositional functions
20
2.4. The theory of types
28
2.5. Conclusion
33
3. Wittgenstein: From Truth Tables to Ordinary Language and the Implications of Generalized Analyticity
35
3.1. The Russellian heritage and its contradictions
35
3.2. The immanence of logic in language
37
3.3. Sense and reference
38
3.4. The language image (the picture theory of language)
41
3.5. Negation and the other logical constants
46
3.6. The Tractatus as initiation into silence
49
3.7. Ordinary language and its rules
55
3.8. Conclusion: Russell vs. Wittgenstein, a heritage
61
4. Hintikka or the Theory of Possible Worlds
65
4.1. Introduction
65
4.2. Referential opacity
65
4.3. Ontological commitment and the elimination of single terms with Quine
68
4.4. Possible worlds and propositional attitudes
70
4.5. The implications of the alternativeness relation and the theory of modus
74
4.6. The ontological commitment
75
4.7. The interpretation of quantification as a question and answer game
77
4.8. Wittgenstein and Hintikka: A concluding comparison
83
Part Two: Language and Context
85
5. Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics and Argumentation
85
5.1. The three levels of language
85
5.2. Logical syntax
86
5.3. Formalization and natural language
88
5.4. The renewal of argumentation
89
5.5. Perelman's new rhetoric
92
5.6. Argumentation in language or the ‘new linguistics’ of Anscombre and Ducrot
94
5.7. Conclusion
96
6. Dialectic and Questioning
99
6.1. Dialectic and Socrates
100
6.2. The middle dialogues: Dialectic and the hypothetical method
105
6.3. The late period: The question of being or the shift from the question to being
110
7. Argumentation in the Light of a Theory of Questioning
115
7.1. Why language?
115
7.2. The two major categories of forms
115
7.3. What is to be understood by ‘question’ and ‘problem’?
117
7.4. The autonomization of the spoken and the written
118
7.5. The proposition as proposition of an answer
121
7.6. What is meaning?
121
7.7. Meaning as the locus of dialectic
129
7.8. Argumentation
130
7.9. Literal and figurative meaning: The origin of messages ‘between the lines’
133
Footnotes
137
References
143
Cited by

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Lempereur, Alain
1991. Logic or rhetoric in law?. Argumentation 5:3  pp. 283 ff. Crossref logo
Meyer, Michel
1989. Toward a rhetoric of reason. Rhetoric Society Quarterly 19:2  pp. 131 ff. Crossref logo
Turnbull, Nick
2006. How Should We Theorise Public Policy? Problem Solving and Problematicity. Policy and Society 25:2  pp. 3 ff. Crossref logo
Turnbull, Nick
2008. Dewey's philosophy of questioning: science, practical reason and democracy. History of the Human Sciences 21:1  pp. 49 ff. Crossref logo
van Eemeren, Frans H., Bart Garssen, Erik C. W. Krabbe, A. Francisca Snoeck Henkemans, Bart Verheij & Jean H. M. Wagemans
2013.  In Handbook of Argumentation Theory,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
van Eemeren, Frans H., Bart Garssen, Erik C. W. Krabbe, A. Francisca Snoeck Henkemans, Bart Verheij & Jean H. M. Wagemans
2014.  In Handbook of Argumentation Theory,  pp. 479 ff. Crossref logo
van Eemeren, Frans H., Bart Garssen, Erik C. W. Krabbe, A. Francisca Snoeck Henkemans, Bart Verheij & Jean H. M. Wagemans
2014.  In Handbook of Argumentation Theory,  pp. 677 ff. Crossref logo
van Eemeren, Frans H. & Rob Grootendorst
1995.  In Handbook of Pragmatics,  pp. 55 ff. Crossref logo
Willard, Charles Arthur
1991. Adaptation to context. Argumentation 5:1  pp. 91 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Philosophy

Philosophy
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  86026346