Discourse Perspectives on English

Medieval to modern

Editors
| University of Turku
| University of Turku
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027253613 (Eur) | EUR 110.00
ISBN 9781588114709 (USA) | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027295729 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
Covering nearly one thousand years, this volume explores medieval and modern English texts from fresh perspectives. Within the relatively new field of historical discourse linguistics, the synchronic analysis of large textual units and consideration of text-external features in relation to discourse has so far received little attention. To fill that gap, this volume offers studies of medieval instructional and religious texts and correspondence from the early modern period. The contributions highlight writer-audience relationships, the intended use of texts, descriptions of text-type, and questions of orality and manuscript contextualization. The topics, ranging from the reception of Old English texts to the conventions of practical instruction in Middle English to the epistolary construction of science in early Modern English, are directly relevant to historical linguists, discourse and text linguists, and students of the history of English.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 119]  2003.  viii, 243 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
vii
Introduction
Ruth Carroll, Risto Hiltunen, Matti Peikola, Janne Skaffari, Sanna-Kaisa Tanskanen, Ellen Valle and Brita Wårvik
1–12
“When you read or hear this story read”: Issues of orality and literacy in Old English texts
Brita Wårvik
13–55
Telling the anchorite code: Ancrene Wisse on language
Risto Hiltunen
57–76
Lexical borrowings in early Middle English religious discourse: A case study of Sawles Warde
Janne Skaffari
77–104
The catalogue: A late Middle English Lollard genre?
Matti Peikola
105–135
Recipes for laces: An example of a Middle English discourse colony
Ruth Carroll
137–165
“Best patterns for your imitation”: Early modern letter-writing instruction and real correspondence
Sanna-Kaisa Tanskanen
167–195
“Let me not lose yr love & friendship”: The negotiation of priority and the construction of a scientific identity in seventeenth-century natural history
Ellen Valle
197–234
Index
235–237
“[...] all authors contribute to historical linguistics in more than one respect: First, they present new findings for the specific subject areas discussed in their chapters; secondly, they offer suggestions and generalisations regarding the discourse colony, text-type or genre under scrutiny; and thirdly, the authors directly or indirectly raise methodological issues for future studies of their topics. Seen as a whole, the book has pioneering spirit in that it names and outlines central problems with which historical linguistics today is faced. These problems range from difficulties of contextualisation to issues of systematic analysis of data.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2003062994 | Marc record