Understanding Patients' Voices

A multi-method approach to health discourse

| Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
| Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027256621 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027268747 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
This volume illustrates the process of conducting interdisciplinary, multi-cultural research into the relationship between patient language use and chronic disease management. The ten chapters in this book provide a model for interdisciplinary research in health discourse from start to finish. Part I describes in detail the conceptualization and design of a multi-year research project exploring language use among people living with diabetes. Part II offers a sampler of a variety of qualitative, quantitative, and contrastive methodologies that have considerable potential in the study of health discourse. Part III brings the research process full circle by discussing issues related to adapting research protocols to diverse cultural contexts, translating results into practice, and working in interdisciplinary teams.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 257]  2015.  xv, 185 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
“In Understanding Patients’ Voices: A multi-method approach to health discourse, Antón and Goering with their interdisciplinary team offer intriguing and instructive insights into a highly successful multi-year examination of the relationship between language use and chronic disease. Their collaborative work illuminates the understudied perspectives of individuals living with diabetes while offering scholars and practitioners a blueprint for research that integrates linguistics, communication studies, sociology, and healthcare. I recommend this volume most enthusiastically!”
“In the authors’ voice the book is “the interdisciplinary study of the relationship between language use and chronic disease management”. More precisely the book addresses the experience of patients with Type 2 Diabetes from a combined health literacy and linguistics perspective. Written in a reader-friendly style and adopting a contrastive as well as a cumulative mixed-methods approach, the authors provide rich insights into how the language (and metaphors) of one’s illness experience (including understanding and expectation) can index patterns of adherence/non-adherence and self-management. The reported findings have the potential to be translated into profiling chronically ill patients as a precursor for their clinical and personal care. The authors deserve credit for sharing their breadth of methodological and analytical repertoires in a detailed, step-by-step manner – which will easily translate to healthcare communication research in parallel contexts.”
“It’s clear that the discourse analysis discussion and examples given by the authors based on their interviews provide a different view of language use in self-management discussions. This perspective is one that will inspire interpreters and translators to listen or read more carefully when working into the target language so as to fully embrace the spirit of the speaker’s message.”
Cited by

Cited by 3 other publications

Biber, Douglas & Susan Conrad
2019.  In Register, Genre, and Style, Crossref logo
Cortes, Viviana & Ulla Connor
2016.  In Talking at Work,  pp. 235 ff. Crossref logo
Wahl, Astrid K., Marit H. Andersen, John Ødemark, Anna Reisæther, Kristin H. Urstad & Eivind Engebretsen
2022. The importance of shared meaning‐making for sustainable knowledge translation and health literacy. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 14 may 2022. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects & Metadata

Communication Studies

Communication Studies
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
ONIX Metadata
ONIX 2.1
ONIX 3.0
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014049087 | Marc record