Designing Speech for a Recipient

The roles of partner modeling, alignment and feedback in so-called 'simplified registers'

| University of Southern Denmark
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027256751 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027266170 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This study asks how speakers adjust their speech to their addressees, focusing on the potential roles of cognitive representations such as partner models, automatic processes such as interactive alignment, and social processes such as interactional negotiation. The nature of addressee orientation is investigated on three candidates for so-called ‘simplified registers’: speech to children (also called motherese or baby talk), speech to foreigners (also called foreigner talk) and speech to robots. The volume integrates research from various disciplines, such as psychology, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and conversation analysis, and offers both overviews of child-directed, foreigner-directed and robot-directed speech and in-depth analyses of the processes involved in adjusting to a communication partner.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 270]  2016.  x, 327 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–x
Introduction
1–12
The role of the addressee: Central notions
13–66
Methods and data
67–86
Talking to children
87–148
Talking to foreigners
149–176
Talking to robots
177–248
Conclusions
249–290
References
291–322
Index
323–327
“Fischer has written a thorough, clear, and masterful contribution to understanding how people talk to children, foreigners, and robots. Do people have a model of their conversational partner, and if so, what is it? Fischer provides one of the most complete and penetrating reviews of these questions I have read. The test of an important work of science is not only how many questions it has answered, but how many it has raised. Fischer has succeeded admirably on both.”
“A distinctive and valuable contribution to the field.”
Designing Speech for a Recipient is recommended reading for researchers with an interest in cognitive and social processes in communicative situations in which one participant perceives the other participant(s) as having limited communicative and linguistic capabilities. Given its interdisciplinary nature, the volume should be relevant to researchers within diverse fields such as interactional sociolinguistics, pragmatics, register studies, (social) cognitive linguistics, communication studies, as well as robotics and AI studies.”
ReferencesThe requested document (/db/data/shared.benjamins.com/references/pbns/pbns.270.refs.xml) was not found
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2018.  In Time in Embodied Interaction [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 293],  pp. 293 ff. Crossref logo
Fischer, Kerstin
2015. Situation in grammar or in frames?. Constructions and Frames 7:2  pp. 258 ff. Crossref logo
Höhn, Sviatlana
2020.  In Maschinen der Kommunikation [ars digitalis, ],  pp. 87 ff. Crossref logo
Schmader, Christopher & William S. Horton
2019. Conceptual Effects of Audience Design in Human–Computer and Human–Human Dialogue. Discourse Processes 56:2  pp. 170 ff. Crossref logo
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 28 october 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016041067 | Marc record