Compliments and Positive Assessments

Sequential organization in multi-party conversations

| Ruhr-University Bochum
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027200778 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027264015 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Compliments are among the most widely studied speech acts in pragmatics. The present study takes a new sequential approach by investigating compliments in context, considering compliment form, as part of a Positive Remark continuum, with the respective Response Strategy uttered in response. Analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively in multi-party conversations of the Santa Barbara Corpus of American English, the sequences suggest a connection between the address and reference terms in the Positive Remarks and the strategies chosen as a response.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 289]  2018.  xv, 253 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of tables
List of figures
Acknowledgments
xv
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–4
Chapter 2. Research on compliments, positive assessments, and their responses
5–34
Chapter 3. Methodology: The data base
35–53
Chapter 4. The coding of the Positive Remark sequences
55–88
Chapter 5. General overview of Positive Remark sequences
89–123
Chapter 6. Positive Remark sequences: Focus on three supercategories
125–183
Chapter 7. Discussion
185–204
Chapter 8. Conclusion and outlook
205–210
References
211–229
Websites
Appendix A. Abbreviations
231–232
Appendix B. Additional tables and text description
233–246
Appendix C. Additional figures
247–250
Index
251–253
“The book is an informative read for those interested in Positive Remarks, and lays important groundwork for further research on the differences between the various types of Positive Remarks and the connection between evaluative turns and their responses.”
References

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Websites

American National Corpus (ANC)
Charlotte Narrative and Conversation Collection (cnnc)
Corpus of Spoken Professional American English (cspa)
International Corpus of English (ICE)
: http://​ice​-corpora​.net​/ice/ [last accessed 20171123]
International Corpus of English (ICE) – Corpus Design
Kirk, John M.
MAXQDA – The Art of Data Analysis: http://​www​.maxqda​.de/ [last accessed 20171123]
Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (micase)
Table: Chi-Square Probabilities: http://​people​.richland​.edu​/james​/lecture​/m170​/tbl​-chi​.html [last accessed 20171123]
Talkbank
: https://​talkbank​.org/ [last accessed 20171123]
Santa Barbara Corpus of Spoken American English (SBCSAE)
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Rudolf von Rohr, Marie-Thérèse & Miriam A. Locher
2020.  In Complimenting Behaviour and (Self-)Praise across Social Media [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 313], Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 31 october 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018008173 | Marc record