Susan Goldin-Meadow

List of John Benjamins publications for which Susan Goldin-Meadow plays a role.

Journal

Articles

Cartmill, Erica A., Lilia Rissman, Miriam A. Novack and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2017 The development of iconicity in children’s co-speech gesture and homesignThe gesture–sign interface in language acquisition / L’interface geste–signe dans l’acquisition du langage, Morgenstern, Aliyah and Michèle Guidetti (eds.), pp. 42–68
Gesture can illustrate objects and events in the world by iconically reproducing elements of those objects and events. Children do not begin to express ideas iconically, however, until after they have begun to use conventional forms. In this paper, we investigate how children’s use of iconic… read more | Article
Church, Ruth Breckinridge and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2017 Chapter 18. So how does gesture function in speaking, communication, and thinking?Why Gesture?: How the hands function in speaking, thinking and communicating, Church, Ruth Breckinridge, Martha W. Alibali and Spencer D. Kelly (eds.), pp. 397–412
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Hunsicker, Dea and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2015 How handshape type can distinguish between nouns and verbs in homesignWhere do nouns come from?, Haviland, John B. (ed.), pp. 111–133
All established languages, spoken or signed, make a distinction between nouns and verbs. Even a young sign language emerging within a family of deaf individuals has been found to mark the noun-verb distinction, and to use handshape type to do so. Here we ask whether handshape type is used to mark… read more | Article
Applebaum, Lauren, Marie Coppola and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2014 Prosody in a communication system developed without a language modelSign Language & Linguistics 17:2, pp. 181–212
Prosody, the “music” of language, is an important aspect of all natural languages, spoken and signed. We ask here whether prosody is also robust across learning conditions. If a child were not exposed to a conventional language and had to construct his own communication system, would that system… read more | Article
Adam Kendon has contributed to every facet of gesture studies, from the co-speech gestures that occur with talk, to the silent gestures that replace talk. This chapter describes work I have done that follows in Adam’s footsteps. I first examine silent gesture in two groups: (1) children whose… read more | Article
Goldin-Meadow, Susan 2014 How gesture helps children learn languageLanguage in Interaction: Studies in honor of Eve V. Clark, Arnon, Inbal, Marisa Casillas, Chigusa Kurumada and Bruno Estigarribia (eds.), pp. 157–172
Children gesture before they begin to speak and continue gesturing throughout the language learning process. This chapter focuses on those gestures, and explores the role they play in language learning. We find that children’s early gestures not only precede, but also predict, the onset of a number… read more | Article
Hunsicker, Dea and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2013 How handshape type can distinguish between nouns and verbs in homesignWhere do nouns come from?, Haviland, John B. (ed.), pp. 354–376
All established languages, spoken or signed, make a distinction between nouns and verbs. Even a young sign language emerging within a family of deaf individuals has been found to mark the noun-verb distinction, and to use handshape type to do so. Here we ask whether handshape type is used to mark… read more | Article
Franklin, Amy, Anastasia Giannakidou and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2011 Negation as structure building in a home sign systemPragmatics and Autolexical Grammar: In honor of Jerry Sadock, Yuasa, Etsuyo, Tista Bagchi and Katharine Beals (eds.), pp. 261–276
We identify a gestural marker for negation in a home sign system: a side-to-side headshake. This marker expresses a meaning that corresponds semantically to a function that applies to a sentence (whose semantic value is a proposition) and yields another, more complex sentence. Combining negation… read more | Article
Özçalışkan, Şeyda and Susan Goldin-Meadow 2011 Chapter 12. Is there an iconic gesture spurt at 26 months?Integrating Gestures: The interdisciplinary nature of gesture, Stam, Gale and Mika Ishino (eds.), pp. 163–174
Previous research has shown that children understand the iconicity of a gesture at 26 months. Here we ask when children begin to display an appreciation of iconicity in the gestures they produce. We observed spontaneous gesture in 40 children interacting with their parents from 14 to 34 months of… read more | Chapter
Goldin-Meadow, Susan 2007 The two faces of gesture: Language and thoughtGestural Communication in Nonhuman and Human Primates, Liebal, Katja, Cornelia Müller and Simone Pika (eds.), pp. 217–231
Gesture is typically produced with speech, forming a fully integrated system with that speech. However, under unusual circumstances, gesture can be produced completely on its own — without speech. In these instances, gesture takes over the full burden of communication usually shared by the two… read more | Article
Goldin-Meadow, Susan 2007 3 Gesture with Speech and Without itGesture and the Dynamic Dimension of Language: Essays in honor of David McNeill, Duncan, Susan D., Justine Cassell and Elena T. Levy (eds.), pp. 31–49
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Goldin-Meadow, Susan 2005 The two faces of gesture: Language and thoughtGestural Communication in Nonhuman and Human Primates, Liebal, Katja, Cornelia Müller and Simone Pika (eds.), pp. 241–257
Gesture is typically produced with speech, forming a fully integrated system with that speech. However, under unusual circumstances, gesture can be produced completely on its own — without speech. In these instances, gesture takes over the full burden of communication usually shared by the two… read more | Article
Goldin-Meadow, Susan 2002 14. Getting a handle on language creationThe Evolution of Language out of Pre-language, Givón, T. and Bertram F. Malle (eds.), pp. 343–374
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Wang, Xiao-lei, Carolyn Mylander and Susan Goldin-Meadow 1993 Language and Environment: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Gestural Communication Systems of Chinese and American Deaf ChildrenPerspectives on Language and Conceptualization, Nuyts, Jan and Eric Pederson (eds.), pp. 167–185
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