Sonia Cristofaro

List of John Benjamins publications for which Sonia Cristofaro plays a role.

Book series

Title

Typological Hierarchies in Synchrony and Diachrony

Edited by Sonia Cristofaro and Fernando Zúñiga

[Typological Studies in Language, 121] 2018. vi, 434 pp.
Subjects Historical linguistics | Theoretical linguistics | Typology

Articles

The possible origins of the various alignment patterns attested in the world’s languages have been the object of sustained interest in both language typology and historical linguistics (see Dahl 2021a for a recent overview). What is meant here by alignment, in a maximally general sense, is any… read more | Introduction
Cristofaro, Sonia 2019 Chapter 3. Nominalization in cross-linguistic diachronic perspectiveNominalization in Languages of the Americas, Zariquiey, Roberto, Masayoshi Shibatani and David W. Fleck (eds.), pp. 169–194
While more and more data are now available on languages rich in nominalizations, such as those of Latin America, the literature on nominalization is mainly synchronically orientented. The paper discusses several pieces of diachronic evidence about the origins of nominalization cross-linguistically.… read more | Chapter
Cristofaro, Sonia and Fernando Zúñiga 2018 Synchronic vs. diachronic approaches to typological hierarchiesTypological Hierarchies in Synchrony and Diachrony, Cristofaro, Sonia and Fernando Zúñiga (eds.), pp. 1–28
Chapter
Cristofaro, Sonia 2016 Chapter 15. Routes to insubordination: A cross-linguistic perspectiveInsubordination, Evans, Nicholas and Honoré Watanabe (eds.), pp. 393–422
Cross-linguistic data suggest that we still know relatively little on the possible origins of insubordination, that is, what source constructions give rise to particular types of insubordinate clauses, through what mechanisms, and why. Insubordinate clauses can develop through a wider range of… read more | Article
Cristofaro, Sonia 2014 Is there really a syntactic category of subordination?Contexts of Subordination: Cognitive, typological and discourse perspectives, Visapää, Laura, Jyrki Kalliokoski and Helena Sorva (eds.), pp. 73–91
While different criteria are used in the literature in order to define subordinate clauses, these clauses are generally assumed to form a syntactic category, in the sense of a syntactically defined class that is relevant to speakers of individual languages. Many phenomena that are usually regarded… read more | Article
Cristofaro, Sonia 2014 Cognitive explanations, distributional evidence, and diachronyTheory and Data in Cognitive Linguistics, Gisborne, Nikolas and Willem B. Hollmann (eds.), pp. 185–210
Cognitively oriented approaches to the study of language standardly use synchronic distributional evidence to make assumptions both about the psychological mechanisms that lead speakers to create particular constructions, and about the components of a speaker’s mental representation of their… read more | Article
Cristofaro, Sonia 2012 Cognitive explanations, distributional evidence, and diachronyTheory and data in cognitive linguistics, Gisborne, Nikolas and Willem B. Hollmann (eds.), pp. 645–670
Cognitively oriented approaches to the study of language standardly use synchronic distributional evidence to make assumptions both about the psychological mechanisms that lead speakers to create particular constructions, and about the components of a speaker’s mental representation of their… read more | Article
Review
Cristofaro, Sonia 2008 8. Asymmetric events, subordination, and grammatical categoriesAsymmetric Events, Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Barbara (ed.), pp. 151–172
The notion of asymmetric events plays a central role in many theories of subordination. Subordination has been associated with various types of event asymmetry, such as foreground-background, figure-ground, asserted vs. nonasserted information, and presence vs. absence of an autonomous cognitive… read more | Article
This paper examines the relativization patterns found in twenty-six languages of Europe, focusing on the strategies used to encode the relativized item. We provide a critical overview of extant classifications of these strategies, and discuss the distribution of these strategies across different… read more | Article
Article
A major issue in cross-linguistic research on case marking is explaining the diverse alignment patterns observed for the three arguments A, S, and P. These patterns have been assumed to reflect principles of optimization in the use of case marking: dedicated case marking is limited to arguments… read more | Article