Miguel A. Jiménez-Crespo

List of John Benjamins publications for which Miguel A. Jiménez-Crespo plays a role.

Journals

Title

Subjects Translation Studies

Articles

This paper critically discusses how crowdsourcing relate to the emergence of the so-called translation augmentation paradigm. As a broad generalization, these two technology-driven phenomena emerged as possible solutions to achieve better, more efficient or speedier solutions to complex problems… read more | Article
The emergence of crowdsourcing has opened up novel ways to initiate, produce and deliver translations in our digitally connected world. New practices and processes brought up by these phenomena have undeniably impacted different collectives with an interest in translation, such as language service… read more | Article
“Literal translation” is a popular construct in Translation Studies. Research from computational approaches has consistently shown that non-literal translations, i.e., renderings semantically and syntactically different or not close to the source text, are more difficult or effortful to produce… read more | Article
For over two decades, Translation Studies (TS) scholars have argued that the discipline is going through a ‘technological turn’. This paper critically questions whether TS has already completed this “paradigmatic” or “disciplinary turn,” “a clearly visible and striking” change of direction that can… read more | Article
Jiménez-Crespo, Miguel A. 2017 The Internet in translation education: Two decades laterTranslation and Interpreting Pedagogy in Dialogue with Other Disciplines, Colina, Sonia and Claudia V. Angelelli (eds.), pp. 31–54
Within the context of the global digital revolution, translation in professional settings cannot be understood without the Internet, as a communicative, documentary, and productivity tool (Cronin 2013; Jimenez-Crespo 2013). Similarly, translation training has been revolutionized by the wide range… read more | Article
Differences in register, lexical use, syntactic shifts or determinologization strategies between source and target medical texts can produce usability or comprehensibility issues (Askehave and Zethsen 2000a; Tercedor and López 2012; Nisbeth Zethsen and Jensen 2012; Alarcón, López-Rodríguez, and… read more | Article
In the midst of a shift from paper to digital texts, web localization represents one of the fastest growing sectors in the translation industry. In this paper, I will argue that Translation Studies (TS) has not devoted enough attention to this phenomenon, partly due to the lack of definition and… read more | Article
Jiménez-Crespo, Miguel A. and Nitish Singh 2016 International business, marketing and translation studies: Impacting research into web localizationBorder Crossings: Translation Studies and other disciplines, Gambier, Yves and Luc van Doorslaer (eds.), pp. 245–262
This chapter delves into the different approaches to localization of websites and the interdisciplinary links between two disciplines that have an interest in the exploration of this phenomenon, translation studies and international business and marketing. The chapter explores how the cultural,… read more | Article
Jiménez-Crespo, Miguel A. 2015 The Internet in translation education: Two decades laterT&I pedagogy in dialogue with other disciplines, Colina, Sonia and Claudia V. Angelelli (eds.), pp. 33–57
Within the context of the global digital revolution, translation in professional settings cannot be understood without the Internet, as a communicative, documentary, and productivity tool (Cronin 2013; Jimenez-Crespo 2013). Similarly, translation training has been revolutionized by the wide range… read more | Article
Jiménez-Crespo, Miguel A. 2015 Dunne, Keiran J. & Elena S. Dunne, eds. 2011. Translation and Localization Management: The Art of the PossibleVoice in Retranslation, Alvstad, Cecilia and Alexandra Assis Rosa (eds.), pp. 115–121
Review
This paper argues that corpus use in translation and the Facebook non-professional crowdsourcing model both aim to create more natural-sounding translations. A number of studies on corpus use support this hypothesis, but, to date, there have been no empirical studies on whether crowdsourcing… read more | Article
Explicitation has long been considered a tendency in translation and has been empirically investigated by a number of scholars. This paper responds to Chesterman´s (2004a: 47) call to test explicitation phenomena on different translation modalities and types, and tests the explicitation hypothesis… read more | Article
For over two decades, the localization industry has striven to produce non-culture-specific texts that can be easily localized into most languages. Nevertheless, contrastive studies have shown that certain features of texts can vary between source and target cultures, such as textual structure or… read more | Article
Current localization QA models are based on componential error-based approaches to quality evaluation. However, as it is more complex to objectively measure pragmatic issues than language or functionality problems, the communicative-pragmatic adequacy of the target text is normally ignored while… read more | Article