Kenneth I. Forster

List of John Benjamins publications for which Kenneth I. Forster plays a role.

Journals

Articles

Witzel, Jeffrey, Samantha Cornelius, Naoko Witzel, Kenneth I. Forster and Jonathan C. Forster 2015 Testing the viability of webDMDX for masked priming experimentsPhonological and Phonetic Considerations of Lexical Processing, Jarema, Gonia and Gary Libben (eds.), pp. 169–198
The DMDX software package (Forster & Forster, 2003) is a Windows-based application that displays stimuli and records responses. Recent developments in this program have made it possible to deploy DMDX experiments over the Internet. This study evaluates the viability of the web-deployable… read more | Article
Witzel, Jeffrey, Samantha Cornelius, Naoko Witzel, Kenneth I. Forster and Jonathan C. Forster 2013 Testing the viability of webDMDX for masked priming experimentsPhonological and Phonetic considerations of Lexical Processing, pp. 421–449
The DMDX software package (Forster & Forster, 2003) is a Windows-based application that displays stimuli and records responses. Recent developments in this program have made it possible to deploy DMDX experiments over the Internet. This study evaluates the viability of the web-deployable… read more | Article
Forster, Kenneth I. 2012 Using a maze task to track lexical and sentence processingMethodological and Analytic Frontiers in Lexical Research, Libben, Gary, Gonia Jarema and Chris Westbury (eds.), pp. 81–91
A word maze consists of a sequence of frames, each containing two alternatives. Subjects are required to select one of those alternatives according to some criterion defined by the experimenter. This simple technique can be used to investigate a wide range of issues. For example, if one alternative… read more | Article
Forster, Kenneth I. 2010 Using a maze task to track lexical and sentence processingMethodological and Analytic Frontiers in Lexical Research (Part I), Jarema, Gonia, Gary Libben and Chris Westbury (eds.), pp. 347–357
A word maze consists of a sequence of frames, each containing two alternatives. Subjects are required to select one of those alternatives according to some criterion defined by the experimenter. This simple technique can be used to investigate a wide range of issues. For example, if one alternative… read more | Article
In semantic categorization, nonwords that are neighbors of exemplars (e.g., turple in an animal categorization task) cause interference, but neighbors of nonexemplars (e.g., tabric) do not. This can be explained in a cascaded activation model in which the decision process selectively monitors… read more | Article