Nitsa Ben-Ari

List of John Benjamins publications for which Nitsa Ben-Ari plays a role.

Title

Beyond transfiction: Translators and (their) authors

Edited by Nitsa Ben-Ari, Patricia Godbout, Klaus Kaindl and Shaul Levin

Special issue of Translation and Interpreting Studies 11:3 (2016) v, 146 pp.
Subjects Interpreting | Translation Studies

Articles

Ben-Ari, Nitsa 2021 Chapter 8. The Translator’s Note revisitedLiterary Translator Studies, Kaindl, Klaus, Waltraud Kolb and Daniela Schlager (eds.), pp. 157–181
Chapter
Ben-Ari, Nitsa and Shaul Levin 2019 Chapter 9. Traditions of translation in Hebrew cultureA World Atlas of Translation, Gambier, Yves and Ubaldo Stecconi (eds.), pp. 193–214
Throughout most of the history of Jewish communities worldwide, diglossia has been the rule rather than the exception. The history of Hebrew translation is hereby told from this special angle of Hebrew’s diglossic existence, encompassing both ‘classical’, genetically related diglossia… read more | Chapter
Ben-Ari, Nitsa and Shaul Levin 2016 Translators and (their) authors in the fictional turnBeyond transfiction: Translators and (their) authors, Ben-Ari, Nitsa, Patricia Godbout, Klaus Kaindl and Shaul Levin (eds.), pp. 339–343
Article
Against the backdrop of the British mandatory rule of Palestine (1917–1948), Socialist and Revisionist factions struggled bitterly over the character of the new Israeli culture/nation in the making. Crucial ideological differences intermingled with violent fights over topical problems such as… read more | Article
Article
Against the backdrop of the British mandatory rule of Palestine (1917–1948), Socialist and Revisionist factions struggled bitterly over the character of the new Israeli culture/nation in the making. Crucial ideological differences intermingled with violent fights over topical problems such as… read more | Article
The “fictional turn” in translation studies has acknowledged the fact that translators/interpreters have been moved from behind the curtain to center stage. Whether this is a result of poststructuralist or postcolonial scholarship, the fact remains that translators/interpreters now figure as… read more | Article
Review
Article
A remarkable phenomenon in Hebrew culture of the 1950s was the emergence of a considerable quantity of translations and pseudo-translations of pulp literature. The phenomenon stemmed from the need of the literary system to renew and stratify itself, supplying the general reading public with popular… read more | Article
Article
Ever since the 18th century revival of Hebrew literature, translation has been considered an efficient tool for ideological manipulation. Christianity has been a traditional candidate for such manipulation. Fear and hatred of the “younger” religion may have accounted for the subversive treatment of… read more | Article