Article published in:
Review of Cognitive Linguistics
Vol. 13:1 (2015) ► pp. 191219
Cited by

Cited by 4 other publications

Chen, Alvin Cheng‐Hsien
2019. Assessing Phraseological Development in Word Sequences of Variable Lengths in Second Language Texts Using Directional Association Measures. Language Learning 69:2  pp. 440 ff. Crossref logo
Schneider, Ulrike
2018. ΔP as a measure of collocation strength. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory 0:0 Crossref logo
Wahl, Alexander & Stefan Th. Gries
2018.  In Lexical Collocation Analysis [Quantitative Methods in the Humanities and Social Sciences, ],  pp. 85 ff. Crossref logo
Wahl, Alexander & Stefan Th. Gries
2020.  In Computational Phraseology [IVITRA Research in Linguistics and Literature, 24],  pp. 84 ff. Crossref logo

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