Article published in:
Review of Cognitive Linguistics
Vol. 13:1 (2015) ► pp. 220256
References

References

Abdi, H.
(2007) Bonferroni and Šidák corrections for multiple comparisons. In N.J. Salkind (Ed.), Encyclopedia of measurement and statistics (pp. 103–107). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Aksan, Y., & Kantar, D.
(2007) When love is a journey in English and in Turkish. In P. Cap & J. Nijakowska (Eds.), Current trends in Pragmatics (pp. 93–109). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
Allan, K.
(2006) On groutnolls and nog-heads: A case study of the interaction between culture and cognition in intelligence metaphors. In A. Stefanowitsch & S.T. Gries (Eds.), Corpus-based approaches to metaphor and metonymy (pp. 175–190). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
(2008) Metaphor and metonymy: A diachronic Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Barcelona, A.
(2003) Names: A metonymic “return ticket” in five languages. Jezikoslovlje, 4(1), 11–41.Google Scholar
(2004) Metonymy behind grammar: The motivation of the seemingly “irregular” grammatical behavior of English paragon names. In G. Radden & K.-U. Panther (Eds.), Studies in linguistic motivation (pp. 357–374). Berlin/New York: Mouton De Gruyter.Google Scholar
(2011) Reviewing the properties and prototype structure of metonymy. In R. Benczes, A. Barcelona, & F.J. Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez (Eds.), Defining metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics: Towards a consensus view (pp. 7–58). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Boers, F.
(2003) Applied linguistics perspectives on cross-cultural variation in conceptual metaphor. Metaphor and Symbol, 18(4), 231–238. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brdar, M., & Brdar-Szabó, R.
(2003) Metonymic coding of linguistic action in English, Croatian and Hungarian. In K.-U. Panther & L. Thornburg (Eds.), Metonymy and pragmatic inferencing (pp. 241–266). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brdar-Szabó, R., & Brdar, M.
(2002) MANNER-FOR-ACTIVITY metonymy in a cross-linguistic perspective. In B. Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk & K. Turewicz (Eds.), Cognitive Linguistics today (pp. 225–246): Peter Lang Verlag.Google Scholar
(2012) The problem of data in the cognitive linguistic research on metonymy: a cross-linguistic perspective. Language Sciences, 34, 728–745. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brdar, M., & Brdar-Szabó, R.
(2014) Where does metonymy begin? Some comments on Janda (2011). Cognitive Linguistics, 25(2), 313–340. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ceccagno, A., & Basciano, B.
(2009) Sino-Tibetan: Mandarin Chinese. In R. Lieber & P. Stekauer (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compounding (pp. 478–490). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Chao, Y.
(1968) A grammar of spoken Chinese. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Charteris-Black, J.
(2001) Cultural resonance in English and Malay figurative phrases: The case of “hand”. In J. Cotterill & A. Ife (Eds.), Language across boundaries (pp. 151–170): London: Continuum.Google Scholar
(2003) Speaking with forked tongue: A comparative study of metaphor and metonymy in English and Malay phraseology. Metaphor and Symbol, 18(4), 289–310. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Charteris-Black, J., & Ennis, T.
(2001) A comparative study of metaphor in Spanish and English financial reporting. English for Specific Purposes, 20(3), 249–266. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chen, G.
(1937) Zhong guo hun yin shi [The history of Chinese marriage]. HongKong: Commerce Publishing House.Google Scholar
Chen, S.H.
(1953) An innovation in Chinese biographical writing. The Journal of Asian Studies, 13, 49–62.Google Scholar
Chen, W.
(1997) Xiu ci xue fa fan [Introduction to Rhetoric]. Shanghai: Shanghai Education Press.Google Scholar
Deignan, A., & Potter, L.
(2004) A corpus study of metaphors and metonyms in English and Italian. Journal of Pragmatics, 36(7), 1231–1252. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dirven, R.
(1994) Metaphor and nation. Frankfurt: Peter Lang GmbH.Google Scholar
(2003) Metonymy and metaphor: Conceptualisation strategies. In R. Dirven & R. Pörings (Eds.), Metaphor and metonymy in comparison and contrast (pp. 75–111). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dobrovol’skij, D., & Piiraninen, E.
(2005) Figurative language: Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic perspectives. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Eberhard, W.
(1971) What is beautiful in a Chinese woman. In W. Eberhard (Ed.), Moral and social values of the Chinese: Selected essays (pp. 271–304). Taipei: Chengwen.Google Scholar
Feyaerts, K.
(1999) Metonymic hierarchies: The conceptualization of stupidity in German idiomatic expressions. In K.-U. Panther & G. Radden (Eds.), Metonymy in language and thought (pp. 309–332). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Geeraerts, D.
(2002) The interaction of metaphor and metonymy in composite expressions. In R. Dirven & R. Pörings (Eds.), Metaphor and metonymy in comparison and contrast (pp. 435–465). Berlin/New York: Mouton De Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Geeraerts, D., & Kristiansen, G.
(2014) Cognitive Linguistics and language variation. In J. Littlemore & J. Taylor (Eds.), The Bloomsbury companion to Cognitive Linguistics (pp. 202–218). London: Bloomsbury Publishing.Google Scholar
Han, C.
(1995) Han yu jie dai yi ci dian [Dictionary of Chinese metonymic senses]. Guangzhou: Guangdong Education Press.Google Scholar
Herrero Ruiz, J.
(2011) The role of metonymy in complex tropes: Cognitive operations and pragmatic implications. In R. Benczes, A. Barcelona, & F.J. Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez (Eds.), Defining metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics: Towards a consensus view (pp. 167–194). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hofstede, G.H.
(1984) Culture’s consequences: International differences in work-related values. California: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
Hui, C.H., & Triandis, H.C.
(1986) Individualism-collectivism: A study of cross-cultural researchers. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 17(2), 225–248. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ibarretxe-Antuñano, I.
(2005) Limitations for cross-linguistic metonymies and metaphors. In J.L. Otal Campo, I. Navarro i Ferrando, & B. Bellés Fortuño (Eds.), Cognitive and discourse approaches to metaphor and metonymy (pp. 187–200). Castellón, Spain: Universitat Jaume I.Google Scholar
Janda, L.
(2011) Metonymy in word-formation. Cognitive Linguistics, 22(2), 359–392. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kövecses, Z.
(2003) Metaphor and emotion: Language, culture, and body in human feeling. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(2005) Metaphor in culture: Universality and variation. New York: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kim, U.
(1994) Individualism and collectivism: Conceptual clarification and elaboration. In U. Kim, H.C. Triandis, Ç. Kâğitçibaşi, S.-C. Choi, & G. Yoon (Eds.), Individualism and collectivism: Theory, method, and applications (pp. 19–40). Thousand Oaks, CA/London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
(1997) Asian collectivism: An indigenous perspective. In H.S.E. Kao & D. Sinha (Eds.), Asian perspectives on psychology (pp. 147–163). New Delhi: SAGE Publications India.Google Scholar
Kleparski, G.
(1996) Semantic change in onomasiological perspective. Paper presented at the Male and Female Terms in English, Umeå University.
(1997) Theory and practice of Historical Semantics: The case of Middle English and Early Modern English synonyms of girl/young woman. Lublin: University Press of the Catholic University of Lublin.Google Scholar
Koch, P.
(2011) The pervasiveness of contiguity and metonymy in semantic change. In K. Allan & J.A. Robinson (Eds.), Current methods in Historical Semantics (pp. 259–312). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kuwahara, Y.
(2004) Social representations of self and society: A cross-cultural investigation in Britain and Japan. PhD dissertation, School of Human Sciences, University of Surrey.
Lakoff, G.
(1987) Women, fire, and dangerous things: What categories reveal anout the mind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M.
(1980) Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Liu, F.
(1999) “Li ci” biao zhu ji qi ta [Swearwords annotation and others]. Ci Shu Yan Jiu [Lexicographical Studies], 2, 40–41.Google Scholar
Łodej, S.
(2012) Concept-driven semasiology and onomasiology of CLERGY. In M. Markus, Y. Iyeiri, R. Heuberger, & E. Chamson (Eds.), Middle and Modern English Corpus Linguistics: A multi-dimensional approach (pp. 93–108). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lou, Z.
(1993) Han yu da ci dian [The great Chinese cictionary]. Shanghai: Publishing House of The Great Chinese Dictionary.Google Scholar
Maalej, Z.
(2004) Figurative language in anger expressions in Tunisian Arabic: An extended view of embodiment. Metaphor and Symbol, 19(1), 51–75. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2007) The embodiment of fear expressions in Tunisian Arabic. In F. Sharifian & G.B. Palmer (Eds.), Applied Cultural Linguistics: Implications for second language learning and intercultural communication (pp. 87–104). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Maalej, Z., & Yu, N.
(2011) Introduction: Embodiment via body parts. In Z. Maalej & N. Yu (Eds.), Embodiment via body parts: Studies from various languages and cultures (pp. 1–20). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Macfarlane, A.
(1978) The origins of English individualism: The family, property and social transition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Nesset, T.
(2010) The art of being negative: metonymical morphological constructions in contrast. Oslo Studies in Language, 2(2), 261–279.Google Scholar
Nivison, D.S.
(1962) Aspects of traditional Chinese biography. Journal of Asian Studies, 21(4), 457–463. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Panther, K.-U., & Thornburg, L.
(1999) The potentiality for actuality metonymy in English and Hungarian. In K.-U. Panther & G. Radden (Eds.), Metonymy in language and thought (pp. 333–357). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Peirsman, Y., & Geeraerts, D.
(2006) Metonymy as a prototypical category. Cognitive Linguistics, 17(3), 269–316. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Radden, G.
(2005) The ubiquity of metonymy. In J.L. Otal Campo, I. Navarro i Ferrando, & B. Bellés Fortuño (Eds.), Cognitive and discourse approaches to metaphor and metonymy (pp. 11–28). Castellón, Spain: Universitat Jaume I.Google Scholar
Radden, G., & Kövecses, Z.
(1999) Towards a theory of metonymy. In K.-U. Panther & G. Radden (Eds.), Metonymy in language and thought (pp. 17–59). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Radden, G., & Seto, K.
(2003) Metonymic construals of shopping requests in HAVE-and BE-languages. In K.-U. Panther & L. Thornburg (Eds.), Metonymy and pragmatic inferencing (pp. 223–240). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sampson, E.E.
(2000) Reinterpreting individualism and collectivism: Their religious roots and monologic versus dialogic person-other relationship. American Psychologist, 55(12), 1425–1432. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schwartz, S.H.
(1990) Individualism-collectivism: Critique and proposed refinements. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 21(2), 139–157. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sharifian, F., Dirven, R., Yu, N., & Niemeier, S.
(2008) Culture, body, and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Simó, J.
(2008) Chess metaphors in American English and Hungarian. Metaphor and Symbol, 24(1), 42–59. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2011) Metaphors of blood in American English and Hungarian: A cross-linguistic corpus investigation. Journal of Pragmatics, 43(12), 2897–2910. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stenroos, M.B.
(2002) Words for MAN in the transmission of Piers Plowman. In J.E.D. Vera (Ed.), A changing world of words: Studies in English Historical Lexicography, Lexicology and Semantics (pp. 375–409). New York/Amsterdam: Rodopi.Google Scholar
Triandis, H.C.
(1988) Collectivism vs. individualism: A reconceptualization of a basic concept in cross-cultural social psychology. In G. Verma & C. Bagley (Eds.), Cross-cultural studies of personality, attitudes and cognition (pp. 60–95). London: MacMillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(1990) Cross-cultural studies of individualism and collectivism. Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 37, 41–133.Google Scholar
(1995) Individualism and collectivism. San Francisco: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Weber, M.
(1930[1904]) The protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism (T. Parson, Trans.). New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
Wu, H.
(2008) Zhong guo gu nv fu shi yu shen ti ge ming, 1911–1935 [Dress and body revolution of Chinese women: 1911–1935]. Shanghai: Oriental Publishing Center.Google Scholar
Yang, S.
(1980) Han wen wen yan xiu ci [Rhetoric in Classical Chinese]. Beijing: Zhonghua Book Company.Google Scholar
Yu, N.
(2008a) Metaphor from body and culture. In R.W. Gibbs (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of metaphor and thought (pp. 247–261). New York: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2008b) The relationship between metaphor, body and culture. In R.M. Frank, R. Dirven, T. Ziemke, & E. Bernárdez (Eds.), Body, language and mind: Sociocultural situatedness (pp. 387–407). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
(2009) The Chinese HEART in a cognitive perspective: Culture, body, and language. Berlin/New York: Mouton De Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, Gong
(1963) Xian dai han yu xiu ci xue [The modern Chinese Rhetoric]. Tianjin: Tianjin People’s Publishing House.Google Scholar
Zhang, Gonggui
(1993) Han yu dai yu ci dian [Dictionary of Chinese substitutive words]. Nanjing: Jiangshu Education Press.Google Scholar
Zhao, W.
(2001) Shu xi de mo sheng ren: Chuan tong wen hua zhong de nv xing shen mei [The damilar stranger: The female aesthetics in the traditional culture]. Shi Jia Zhuang: He Bei People’s Publishing House.Google Scholar
Zheng, J.
(2008) Tu shuo zhong guo chuan tong fu shi [A pictorial introduction to traditional Chinese clothing]. Xi’an: World Publishing Corporation.Google Scholar
Zhou, X., & Gao, C.
(1994) Zhong guo gu dai fu shi da guan [An introduction to ancient Chinese articles of clothing]. Chongqing: Chongqing Publishing House.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Imamović, Adisa & Anela Mulahmetović Ibrišimović
2015. Some conceptual and grammatical properties of body part metonymies in English and Bosnian. ExELL 3:1  pp. 26 ff. Crossref logo
Wong, May L-Y
2020. Mechanisms of semantic change. Asian Languages and Linguistics 1:2  pp. 251 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 09 september 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.