Article published in:
Applying Cognitive Linguistics: Figurative language in use, constructions and typology
Edited by Ana María Piquer-Píriz and Rafael Alejo-González
[Review of Cognitive Linguistics 14:1] 2016
► pp. 5172
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Cited by

Cited by 1 other publications

Zibin, Aseel, Abdel Rahman Mitib Altakhaineh & Elham T. Hussein
2020. On the comprehension of metonymical expressions by Arabic-speaking EFL learners: A cognitive linguistic approach. Topics in Linguistics 21:1  pp. 45 ff. Crossref logo

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