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Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Karin Ryding & David Wilmsen
2021.  In The Cambridge Handbook of Arabic Linguistics, Crossref logo
Sinatora, Francesco L.
2021.  In The Cambridge Handbook of Arabic Linguistics,  pp. 532 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 31 march 2022. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.