Textplicating Iconophones

Articulatory iconic action in Ulysses

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This volume applies a sign-oriented approach to the description of articulatory and acoustic iconic phenomena in James Joyce’s Ulysses. In its hypothesis, the greater the role of sensory experience in the message of a text, the more likely it is to employ linguistic representation in articulated sounds iconically to affect sensory experience. Ulysses is presented as a work of art whose emphasis on sensual impression and sensory experience is reflected in the composition and distribution of its phonemes.

Four English phonemes are examined, each in several contexts in Ulysses. A systematic association of resemblance is found between the manner and effort involved in the articulation of each phoneme relative to other phonemes and sounds, and the manner in which semantic content is arranged in the scenes and themes of the book. The different emphases of semantic arrangement associated with each of the examined phonemes are maintained across diverse themes, varied scopes of reference and opposed manners of contextualization. The phonological unit is therefore perceived to carry a semantic impact to complement its differentiating role in linguistic signification. It also offers an innovative approach to Ulysses and exposes new semantic nuances in its narration and characterization techniques.
[Studies in Functional and Structural Linguistics, 72]  2016.  xvii, 333 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgement
xiii–xiv
Symbols and Terms
xv–xvi
Lists of Tables
xvii–xviii
PREMISES AND HYPOTHESIS
From phoneme and juncture to an hypothesis of articulatory iconic action in James Joyce’s Ulysses
1–4
Reintroducing linguistic substance
5–18
Three basic theoretical premises: The binary sign, efficiency and synergesis in language
19–22
An hypothesis of articulatory iconic relation between phoneme and text
23–30
Illustrating Ulysses from the perspective articulatory iconic action
31–48
Articulatory iconic action
49–52
From articulatory iconic action to sound symbolic phenomena
53–76
Iconic features of juncture as the method of illustration: Illustration modelled as juncture
77–80
ILLUSTRATIONS
Part I. ŋ
Chapter 1. Suggesting an invariable bias for +boundary in ŋ
81–98
Morphological Inventory
Chapter 2. n repetition + [-i]ng, identifying the scope of a larger-than-word segment: Theme boundary
99–118
Chapter 3. [-i]ng repetition in lexeme+-ing: An association between boundary and inegration in -ing. Articulatory iconic representation of theme boundary in the context of the character of Stephen Dedalus, passage- and text-scope
119–146
Part II. d
Morphological Inventory
Chapter 4. -ed repetition for theme delimitation
147–158
Chapter 5. (+/–a)d- in diaphane | adiaphane – the transparent and the opaque
159–176
Lexical Inventory
Chapter 6. [lr ↔ ]d repetition and rearrangement in lord | darl+
177–190
Part III. ʦ
Morphological Inventory
Chapter 7. An association between the distribution of ʦ and rhythmic sequencing: whores’ gets | bastards’ ghosts
191–210
Chapter 8. ʦ and the structuring of topic and comment: Sequencing-segmenting sentences
211–234
Part IV. s
Morphological Inventory
Chapter 9. The association of -ce with a bias for integration: one | once
235–266
Chapter 10. “Contraction” of a copular construct: it’s > ’s-
267–276
Lexical Inventory
Chapter 11. An association between s and text-wide integration: The case of yes
277–300
Conclusion
301–306
References
307–316
Appendix
317–324
Subject Index
325–332
Theme Index
333–334
Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: CF/2AB – Linguistics/English
BISAC Subject: LIT004120 – LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015046292