Guidelines

For the benefit of production efficiency and the production of texts of the highest quality and consistency, we urge you to follow these submission guidelines.

Contributions should be in English or Spanish. If you are not a native speaker it is advisable to have your text checked by a native speaker before submission.

Manuscripts should be submitted online.

Spelling in papers in English should be either British English or American English consistently.

All pages should be numbered throughout.

The first page should include the title only. Please DO NOT include any identifying information on the uploaded document; 3 key words; and self-contained abstracts (100-150 words) in English or Spanish. All articles written in Spanish must also include an English version of the title and abstract. All submissions should be between 6300-8300 words not including the abstract or title page.

Authors are responsible for observing the laws of copyright when quoting or reproducing material.

When submitting the final manuscript that has been accepted for publication, please provide the following:

  1. Final version in Word with the name of the file as follows: Last name of first author, underscore, one key term, underscore, date. For example: “Hoot_prosody_11nov2011.”
  2. All text and graphic files of the final version of the manuscript. Please delete any personal comments so that these cannot mistakenly be typeset, and check that all files are readable. Please supply Figures and Plates as Encapsulated Postscript (EPS) or Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) conversion in addition to the source files. Please ensure the resolution is fit for print media, preferably 300 dpi.
  3. If your manuscript has special characters: An identical PDF file with embedded fonts, showing all special characters as they should be printed. During the production process, the PDF files are referenced by the typesetter and is of great help to solve problems in the files, such as conversion errors, distorted tables, lost graphs, etc.
  4. Signed copyright assignment form.

Lay-out

Our typesetters will do the final formatting of your document. However, some of the text enhancement cannot be done automatically and therefore we kindly ask you to carefully observe the following style.

Please use a minimum of page settings. The preferred setting is 12 pt Times New Roman, double line spacing, on 13 x 22 cm (5" x 8.6") text area. With this setting the ratio manuscript to typeset pages is roughly 2:1. The only relevant codes are those pertaining to font enhancements (italics, bold, caps, small caps, etc.), punctuation, and the format of the references. Whatever formatting or style conventions you use, please be consistent.

Please do not use right-hand justification or automatic hyphenation.

Please use Unicode fonts for special characters or supply the required TrueType or PostScript Type 1 fonts with your submission. For texts including examples or fragments in Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, or Korean this is required. Otherwise, any symbols or visual aspects that you cannot produce in electronic form should be marked clearly in red on the manuscript. If a symbol occurs frequently you can use an alternative symbol (e.g.  at # $ %) and enclose a list of these with their correct transcription.

Tables, figures and plates

  1. Tables and figures should be numbered consecutively and provided with concise captions (max. 240 characters). Captions for tables and figures should appear above the table or figure rather than below.
  2. All figures and tables should be referenced in the text, e.g. (see Figure 5). Please do not use relative indicators such as “see the table below”, or “in this table: ...”.
  3. All figures and tables should appear in the main document. Please do not send figures and tables in a separate document.
  4. The journal will be printed in black & white. Please make sure any illustrations are still meaningful when printed in black & white.
  5. All tables, plates, and figures eventually have to fit the following text area, either portrait or landscape: 12 cm x 20 cm at 8 pt minimum.
  6. Notes in tables and figures should not be regular endnotes. Please use a table note or a figure note as in the example below. Standard note indicators in tables are *, **, †, ‡. The note itself is then inserted directly below the table/figure.
  7. In tables, keep shading to a functional minimum and for individual cells only, not for entire rows or columns.

Running heads

Please do not include running heads in your article. In case of a long title, please suggest a short one for the running head (max.55 characters) on the title page of your manuscript.

Emphasis and foreign words

Use italics for foreign words, highlighting, and emphasis. Bold should be used only for highlighting within italics and for headings. Please refrain from the use of FULL CAPS (except for focal stress and abbreviations) and underlining (except for highlighting within examples, as an alternative for boldface).

Transliteration

Please transliterate into English any examples from languages that use a non-Latin script, using the appropriate transliteration system (ISO or LOC).

Chapters and headings: Chapters or articles should be reasonably divided into numbered sections and, if necessary, into subsections. Please mark the hierarchy of subheadings as follows:

Heading A = bold, two lines space above and one line space below.
Heading B = italics, one line space above and one line space below.
Heading C = italics, one line space above, text on new line
Heading D = italics, one line space above; period; run on text.

Quotations: Text quotations in the main text should be given in double quotation marks. Quotations longer than 3 lines should have a blank line above and below and a left indent, without quotation marks, and with the appropriate reference to the source.

Listings: Should not be indented. If numbered, please number as follows:

1. ..................... or a. .......................

2. ..................... or b. .......................

Listings that run on with the main text should be numbered in parentheses: (1).............., (2)............., etc.

Examples and glosses

Examples should be numbered with Arabic numerals (1,2,3, etc.) in parentheses.

Examples in languages other than the language in which your contribution is written should be in italics with an approximate translation. Between the original and the translation, glosses can be added. This interlinear gloss gets no punctuation and no highlighting. For the abbreviations in the interlinear gloss, CAPS or SMALL CAPS can be used, which will be converted to small caps by our typesetters in final formatting.

Please note that lines 1 and 2 are lined up through the use of spaces: it is essential that the number of elements in lines 1 and 2 match. If two words in the example correspond to one word in the gloss use a full stop to glue the two together (2a). Morphemes are separated by hyphens (1, 2b).

Every next level in the example gets one indent/tab.

(1)       Kare wa    besutoseraa  o       takusan kaite-iru.        

            he   TOP  best-seller    ACC    many   write-PERF    

            “He has written many best-sellers.’”                               

(2)       a.         Jan houdt van Marie.

                        Jan loves      Marie

                        “Jan loves Marie.”

            b.         Ed en  Floor  gaan samen-wonen.

                        Ed and Floor go    together-live.INF

                        “Ed and Floor are going to live together.”

Notes

Notes should be kept to a minimum. Note indicators in the text should appear at the end of sentences and follow punctuation marks.

References:

It is essential that the references are formatted to the specifications given in these guidelines, as these cannot be formatted automatically. This book series uses the ‘Author-Date’ style as described in the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.
References in the text: These should be as precise as possible, giving page references where necessary; for example (Clahsen 1991, 252) or: as in Brown et al. (1991, 252). All references in the text should appear in the references section.
References section: References should be listed first alphabetically and then chronologically. The section should include all (and only!) references that are actually mentioned in the text.
A note on capitalization in titles. For titles in English, CMS uses headline-style capitalization. In titles and subtitles, capitalize the first and last words, and all other major words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, some conjunctions). Do not capitalize articles; prepositions (unless used adverbially or adjectivally, or as part of a Latin expression used adverbially or adjectivally); the conjunctions and, but, for, or, nor; to as part of an infinitive; as in any grammatical function; parts of proper names that would be lower case in normal text; the second part of a species name. For more details and examples, consult the Chicago Manual of Style. For any other languages, and English translations of titles given in square brackets, CMS uses sentence-style capitalization: capitalization as in normal prose, i.e., the first word in the title, the subtitle, and any proper names or other words normally given initial capitals in the language in question.

Examples

Book:

Görlach, Manfred. 2003. English Words Abroad. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Spear, Norman E., and Ralph R. Miller (eds). 1981. Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in book):

Adams, Clare A., and Anthony Dickinson. 1981. “Actions and Habits: Variation in Associative Representation during Instrumental Learning.” In Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms, ed. by Norman E. Spear, and Ralph R. Miller, 143–186. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in journal):

Claes, Jeroen, and Luis A. Ortiz López. 2011. “Restricciones pragmáticas y sociales en la expresión de futuridad en el español de Puerto Rico [Pragmatic and social restrictions in the expression of the future in Puerto Rican Spanish].” Spanish in Context 8: 50–72.

Rayson, Paul, Geoffrey N. Leech, and Mary Hodges. 1997. “Social Differentiation in the Use of English Vocabulary: Some Analyses of the Conversational Component of the British National Corpus.” International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 2 (1): 120–132.

Appendixes

Appendixes should follow the References section.

Manuscripts should be submitted online and all editorial correspondence should be sent to the Editors at the following address: siceditorialassistant at gmail.com
 
BOOK REVIEWS
 
All book reviews should be submitted online 

GUÍA 2018 PARA LA PRODUCCIÓN DE RESEÑAS EN SPANISH IN CONTEXT

1. Adjuntar en archivo separado una nota biográfica de 100 palabras sobre el reseñador/a en la misma lengua en la que se escribirá la reseña y en ella, poner la dirección institucional del reseñador/a debajo de las referencias, en el cierre de todo el texto.

2. La extensión de la reseña será de alrededor de 3000 palabras para los libros de un único autor pero puede extenderse a 5000 palabras para los volúmenes colectivos y en particular si es un manual de más de 35 capítulos, el máximo se puede extender a 6000 si se emplea con enunciados informativos.

3. Encabezar la reseña sólo con los siguientes datos de la obra: nombre completo del autor o de los autores, título completo, lugar y año de edición, editorial, número de páginas e ISBN. Si fuese también un libro electrónico, añadir la correspondiente dirección de Internet.

A continuación, en otro renglón, consignar “Reseñado por” seguido del nombre y apellido del reseñador/a sin incluir grados académicos ni especificar si se es alumno, profesor o investigador.

4. Al final de la reseña, consignar la dirección institucional bien detallada del reseñador, la institución en la que desarrolla sus actividades y la dirección electrónica institucional.

INSTRUCTIVO PARA LA PRODUCCIÓN DE RESEÑAS

5. Hacer todo el texto de la reseña con un tono preferentemente evaluativo y expresando, en todo momento, una toma de posición ante la obra reseñada. No separar el texto en un componente de información factual como mero resumen del contenido de la obra y otro componente valorativo como crítica. Todos los capítulos o partes de un libro deben ser objeto de consideración crítica.

6. Al inicio de la reseña, presentar el tema y el problema central (o los temas y los problemas centrales) del documento reseñado.

7. Especificar a quiénes va dirigida la obra de manera preferente o quiénes son sus lectores potenciales. Podría existir una divergencia entre lo que el autor declara como su auditorio y lo que el reseñador considera que es el auditorio que verdaderamente se adecua a las características de la obra.

8.  Presentar la estructura (partes y capítulos) de la obra junto con una síntesis completa del contenido.

9. En el caso de volúmenes colectivos, se recomienda distribuir equitativamente la atención a cada una de las partes.

10.  Mencionar la existencia de glosarios, apéndices o bibliografías comentadas.

11. Poner el libro en relación con el resto de la obra del mismo autor, así como con otros trabajos del mismo tema e incluso con orientaciones metodológicas similares.

12. Contextualizar el libro relacionando su forma y su contenido con el tiempo y el lugar en el que haya aparecido.

13. Identificar las contribuciones más originales y los puntos más sólidamente abordados por parte del autor o de los autores.

14. Identificar las limitaciones del alcance de la obra y los puntos débiles del tratamiento del tema.

15. Se recomienda citar libros directamente relacionados con el texto evaluado, lo que permitiría el establecimiento de comparaciones y la localización de coincidencias temáticas.

16. Evitar las citas textuales de segunda mano; es decir, la reproducción de un texto citado dentro del libro reseñado.  Conviene, por el contrario, citar de primera mano; es decir, hacer referencia a otros libros leídos por el reseñador o reseñadora que se comparan o se ponen en relación con el libro reseñado.

17. Todos los ejemplos incluidos en este documento provienen de contribuciones recibidas. Evitar expresiones sin contenido informativo y de tono personal (puesto que toda la reseña expresa el punto de vista del reseñador) como "Creo importante formular aquí algunas consideraciones", "encontré algunos datos interesantes que quiero incluir en la presente reseña", "X que creo vale la pena incluir en la presente", “desde mi punto de vista”, “A lo largo de la lectura, no dejaba de preguntarme si las propuestas de XX no eran exclusivas del español”, “Siempre me ha resultado difícil aceptar esta propuesta, ya que …”, etc.

Asegurarse de que cada oración sea verdaderamente relevante desde el punto de vista informativo, preferir enunciados concisos y cargados de contenido, a la vez que se evitan las especulaciones innecesarias, por ej. “No habrá sido fácil para las editoras hacer la división del libro en diacronía, sincronía y contacto.” y se evitan largas oraciones que no avanzan la evaluación, por ej. “En segundo lugar, por un lado, la (inter)subjetividad —agrego— propia de todo acto comunicativo, entendida en la línea de Émile Benveniste”.

Evitar el tono jocoso inapropiado para una valoración científica, por ej. “pienso que habría tal vez que recurrir a la propuesta de Angel Rosenblat (escuchada en un curso dado por él en México) sobre la “gastronomía diferente” de las regiones hispanoamericanas: ¡en las tierras bajas se comen las consonantes, en las tierras altas, las vocales!”

Evitar enunciados metatextuales que no son indispensables para organizar el texto, por ej. “No hay espacio para discutir la causa de las diferencias”, o resultan obvios, por ej. “Sin pretender abarcar aquí todos los hallazgos de la investigadora, menciono aquí unos cuantos.”

18. Tener presente, en todo momento, que nuestros lectores pueden estar en cualquier lugar del mundo.  Por tanto, se recomienda estar atento a los posibles problemas derivados de presuposiciones y de sobreentendidos. Así, por ejemplo, habría que evitar expresiones como "los conocidos titulares de La Vanguardia" y reemplazarlas por "los titulares de La Vanguardia muy conocidos en Barcelona (España)".

Asimismo, se ruega no hacer aseveraciones sobre los intereses de nuestros lectores porque SiC es verdaderamente internacional y hay suscripciones en todos los continentes. Evitar la vaguedad, por ej. “cuyos títulos captan la atención del lector por su originalidad y creatividad respecto a otras publicaciones más convencionales” puesto que no se puede esperar que el lector de cualquier país reconozca la referencia de “otras publicaciones”. Por el contrario, preferir referencias específicas que pongan el libro reseñado en relación con libros que sean comparables, ya sean equivalentes u opuestos, a fin de valorarlos contrastivamente.

19. Seguir en todo momento las convenciones de cita que se indican para el resto de las secciones de Spanish in Context. Con respecto a la puntuación, tener en cuenta que, al introducir ejemplos, no se pone dos puntos después de “como”. La primera vez que se menciona una entidad nombrarla de manera completa y poner las siglas entre paréntesis. Las menciones posteriores pueden hacerse solo con las siglas.

20. No introducir subtítulos, secciones internas, notas al pie, notas al final, información personal sobre la biografía del autor u obtenida de blogs personales, notas sobre la financiación del reseñador, ni subsidios del reseñador.

21. Insistimos nuevamente en el principio de la informatividad desarrollado en el punto 17, por eso se solicita observar que en los siguientes casos se elimina el material en cursiva: “La última parte del libro, “Aplicación empírica”, como su título indica, está destinada a comprobar empíricamente los postulados teóricos propuestos.”; “Como último apunte, debemos señalar que el trabajo de Caravedo resulta  complejo.”  y “Consideramos  que  estas  observaciones  son  una  llamada  de  atención importante.”

22. Incluir una lista encabezada con el título "Referencias", no llamarla “Bibliografía”.

References:

It is essential that the references are formatted to the specifications given in these guidelines, as these cannot be formatted automatically. This book series uses the ‘Author-Date’ style as described in The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).

References in the text: These should be as precise as possible, giving page references where necessary; for example (Clahsen 1991, 252) or: as in Brown et al. (1991, 252). All references in the text should appear in the references section.

References section: References should be listed first alphabetically and then chronologically. The section  should  include  all (and  only!)  references  that  are  actually  mentioned  in  the  text. A note on capitalization in titles. For titles in English, CMS uses headline-style capitalization. In titles and subtitles, capitalize the first and last words, and all other major words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, some conjunctions). Do not  capitalize articles;  prepositions (unless used adverbially or adjectivally, or as part of a Latin expression used adverbially or adjectivally); the conjunctions and, but, for, or, nor; to as part of an infinitive; as in any grammatical function; parts of proper names that would be lower case in normal text; the second part of a species name. For more details and examples, consult the Chicago Manual of Style. For any other languages, and English translations of titles given in square brackets, CMS uses sentence-style capitalization: capitalization as in normal prose, i.e., the first word in the title, the subtitle, and any proper names or other words normally given initial capitals in the language in question.

Examples

Book:

Görlach, Manfred. 2003. English Words Abroad. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 

Spear, Norman E., and Ralph R. Miller (eds). 1981. Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in book):

Adams, Clare A., and Anthony Dickinson. 1981. “Actions and Habits: Variation in Associative Representation during Instrumental Learning.” In Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms, ed. by Norman E. Spear, and Ralph R. Miller, 143-186. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Article (in journal):

Claes, Jeroen, and Luis A. Ortiz López. 2011. “Restricciones pragmáticas y sociales en la expresión de futuridad en el español de Puerto Rico [Pragmatic and social restrictions in the expression of the future in Puerto Rican Spanish].” Spanish in Context 8: 50-72.

Rayson, Paul, Geoffrey N. Leech, and Mary Hodges. 1997. “Social Differentiation in the Use of English Vocabulary:  Some  Analyses  of  the  Conversational  Component  of  the  British  National Corpus.”International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 2 (1): 120-132.