Searching for Structure

The problem of complementation in colloquial Indonesian conversation

| Rice University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027226235 (Eur) | EUR 112.00
ISBN 9781588113672 (USA) | USD 168.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027296726 | EUR 112.00 | USD 168.00
 
This book argues against the existence of complementation in colloquial Indonesian, and discusses the ramifications of these findings for a discourse-functional understanding of grammatical categories and linguistic structure. Based on a close analysis of a corpus of spontaneous conversational Indonesian data, the author examines four construction types which express what is often encoded by complements in other languages: juxtaposed clauses, material introduced by the discourse marker bahwa, serial verbs, and epistemic expressions with the suffix -nya. These four construction types offer no evidence to support complementation as a viable grammatical category in colloquial spoken Indonesian. Rather, they are best understood as emergent, discourse-level phenomena, arising from the interactive and communicative goals of language users. The lack of evidence for complementation in colloquial Indonesian reaffirms the need to understand linguistic structure as language-particular and diverse, and emphasizes the centrality of studying linguistic categories based on their actual occurrence in natural discourse.
[Studies in Discourse and Grammar, 13]  2003.  x, 205 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
ix
1. Preliminaries
1
2. Juxtaposed clauses
37
3. Complementizers in context: An analysis of bahwa
93
4. Verbs in series
127
5. Epistemic — nya constructions
153
6. Conclusion
187
References
193
Appendices
199
Name index
201
Subject index
203
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2002043615