The Mirror of Grammar

Theology, philosophy and the Modistae

| Darwin College, Cambridge
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027245908 (Eur) | EUR 110.00
ISBN 9781588111760 (USA) | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027297303 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
Much is known about the grammar of the modistae and about its eclipse; this book sets out to trace its rise. In the late eleventh century grammar became an analytical rather than an exegetical discipline under the impetus of the new theology. Under the impetus of Arab learning the ancient sciences were reshaped according to the norms of Aristotle’s Analytics, and developed within a structure of speculative sciences beginning with grammar and culminating in theology. Though the modistae acknowledge Aristotle, Donatus, Priscian and the Arab commentators, their roots also lie in Augustine and Boethius, and they took as much from their scholastic contemporaries as they gave them. This book traces the genesis of a grammar which communicated freely with other speculative sciences, shared their structures and methods, and affirmed its own individuality by defining its object as the causes of language.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
ix
Introduction
1–10
1. Vox , Articulation and Porphyry
11–38
2. Esse, Intelligere, Consignificare
39–68
3. Noun and Pronoun
69–102
4. Verb and Participle
103–132
5. The Indeclinable Parts of Speech
133–164
6. Construction and Syntax
165–198
Conclusion: Silvering the Mirror of Language
199–214
References
215–223
Index Auctoritatum
225–228
Index Rerum
229–236
“[...] a particularly thorough historical exploration of the Modistae, the medieval school of speculative grammar that sought to blend Aristotelian logic with Augustinian views on language [...]”
“For more than seven centuries the Wise in Dante’s Sphere of the Sun have awaited a synthesis of their linguistic wisdom in the context of their understanding of God and the human mind. Kelly, having accomplished this monumental task, has earned his seat among them. He charts the revolutionary developments in grammatical theory that took place in the 12th and 13th centuries, and most intensely in the Paris of the 1260s-70s, which he compares to MIT in the 1950s-60s. Composed of erudition and insight in equal measures, the book radiates enlightenment and inspiration. The balance among topics and chapters is exquisite, the writing crystalline. In a word, the book is great, in both the classical and vernacular senses.”
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Colombat, Bernard
2016.  In History of Linguistics 2014 [Studies in the History of the Language Sciences, 126],  pp. 83 ff. Crossref logo
Fernandes, Gonçalo
2017. Syntax in the earliest Latin-Portuguese grammatical treatises. Historiographia Linguistica 44:2-3  pp. 228 ff. Crossref logo
Fredborg, Karin Margareta
2014. Medieval Commentators on the Notion ‘persona agentis’ in Priscian’s Syntactic Theory. Historiographia Linguistica 41:2-3  pp. 219 ff. Crossref logo
Kelly, L.G.
2011. The Discipline of Writing and Speaking Correctly: Priscian and his Legacy. Historiographia Linguistica 38:1-2  pp. 127 ff. Crossref logo
Luhtala, Anneli
2020.  In Chapters of Dependency Grammar [Studies in Language Companion Series, 212],  pp. 24 ff. Crossref logo
Pasnau, Robert
2009.  In The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy, Crossref logo
Rastogi, Raashi
2018. Unruly Grammar: Linking Vernacular English to Changing Models of Early Modern Pedagogy and Power Politics. English Literary Renaissance 48:1  pp. 98 ff. Crossref logo
Reinikka, Anna
2017. Latin parsing grammars from the Carolingian age to the later Middle Ages. Historiographia Linguistica 44:2-3  pp. 255 ff. Crossref logo
Rosier-Catach, Irène
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: HP – Philosophy
BISAC Subject: PHI000000 – PHILOSOPHY / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2002074488