A History of the Study of the Indigenous Languages of North America

| Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027210494 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027258977 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
The languages indigenous to North America are characterized by a remarkable genetic and typological diversity. Based on the premise that linguistic examples play a key role in the origin and transmission of ideas within linguistics and across disciplines, this book examines the history of approaches to these languages through the lens of some of their most prominent properties. These properties include consonant inventories and the near absence of labials in Iroquoian languages, gender in Algonquian languages, verbs for washing in the Iroquoian language Cherokee and terms for snow and related phenomena in Eskimo-Aleut languages. By tracing the interpretations of the four examples by European and American scholars, the author illustrates their role in both lay and professional contexts as a window onto unfamiliar languages and cultures, thus allowing a more holistic view of the history of language study in North America.
[Studies in the History of the Language Sciences, 129]  2021.  xiv, 443 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgements
ix–x
List of Abbreviations
xi–xii
List of Illustrations
xiii–xiv
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–8
Chapter 2. The languages of North America: An overview
9–86
Chapter 3. Studies of the languages of North America
87–130
Chapter 4. Sound systems in Iroquoian languages
131–172
Chapter 5. Gender in Algonquian languages
173–224
Chapter 6. Cherokee verbs for washing
225–274
Chapter 7. Eskimo words for snow
275–322
Chapter 8. Concluding discussion
323–356
References
357–420
Index of Biographical Names
421–430
Index of Subjects and Terms
431–438
Index of Languages, Dialects and Language Families
439–443
References

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